A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Corey Coleman Scouting Report

Corey Coleman, WR, Baylor

5’10 190 lbs.

Coleman

Baylor receiver Corey Coleman (1) brings in the catch amongst a West Virginia defender during the first quarter of a NCAA college football game on Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015 at McLane Stadium in Waco, TX. Baylor won 62-38.

OVERVIEW

Coleman is a diminutive, explosive playmaker with solid route running and at-times spectacular hands.

His blocking and outside receiving ability are both limited by his size, however he is still winning to go up for jump balls and inside on both runs and crossing routes.

He’s also a strong runner out of the backfield, lining up as a running back, rushing off tackle and counters; true running back plays.

His greatest asset, however, is his deep-ball tracking ability. He can run right by defenders and under deep throws with little apparent effort.

He must learn how to use his athleticism more on tight coverage and be able to use the elusiveness he showed against West Virginia to realize his full potential.

Receiver Breakdown:

Hands: 18 out of 20

He’s a gifted hands catcher who rarely has focus drops and often comes up with effortless catches downfield. His main problem is when he has to reach for balls outside his catch radius.

Route Running: 16 out of 20

Most of his routes are crisp, but he doesn’t run a full route tree due to the Baylor offense limiting his opportunities.

Blocking: 11 out of 15

His size limits his effectiveness, he also lacks consistent effort when the play is away from him, even walking and stopping entirely while a play is still going.

Athleticism: 13 out of 15

His speed and agility are off the charts. His jumping ability looks solid, not spectacular.

Run after catch: 15 out of 15

He can take short passes to the house and almost always finds positive yards after the catch. His play against West Virginia in this regard was transcendent

Size: 3 out of 10

Not only is he small and short, it limits his effectiveness noticeably. It clearly keeps him from being in the conversation for best prospect in this draft.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

His ability to dip in and out of cuts and maintain balance is eye-opening, to say the least.

Total Prospect Rating: 81/100

NFL Comparison: Golden Tate, WR, Lions

TateColeman 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the hands, route running and quickness to dominate from the slot, Coleman compares favorably to Tate who has made a living in the NFL burning defenses both deep and after the catch on underneath routes. Both have also proven to be effective runners out of the backfield, though Coleman is probably already more gifted in this aspect.

Senior Bowl: On Defensive Stats

I noticed that it was somewhat difficult to find defensive stats for the senior bowl so I went through looking for sacks in the play-by-play. This is what I found:

TOP PERFORMER: Shawn Oakman, DE, Baylor

Oakman

2 sacks, 1 forced fumble

 

Vernon Butler, DT, Louisiana Tech

Butler

1 sack, 1 forced fumble

 

Noah Spence, DE/OLB, Eastern Kentucky

Spence

1 sack

 

Sheldon Day, DT, Notre Dame

Day

1 sack

 

Javon Hargrave, DT, South Carolina State

Hargrave

1 sack

Also, on recommendation, I went a little deeper into the game and scoured what film I could gather to find some more defensive information:

  • There were no interceptions in the game. No turnovers at all. Each of the forced fumbles were recovered by the offense.
  • Jalen Mills, LSU FS, was playing corner in the game and had two PBU’s one of Ohio State receiver Braxton Miller on a slant and another against a low backshoulder throw. Showed great instincts and closing speed on both.
  • I also saw Alabama corner Cyrus Jones get way too physical and get penalized in the endzone for a pass interference. He never even turned his head. He’ll get burned for that at the next level.
  • Jake Ganus, Georgia Linebacker, got beat by Ohio State tight end Nick Vannett for a 29 yard pass from North Dakota State QB Carson Wentz. Ganus was in zone and also came up with the tackle.
  • Northern Iowa’s Deiondre’ Hall, playing corner, gave too much cushion on a 12 yard comeback from Mississippi State QB Dak Prescott to South East Missouri State receiver Paul McRoberts. Hall made the tackle.
  • Prescott found McRoberts again in the endzone for a 5 yard touchdown, Hall had primary coverage and Utah inside linebacker Jared Norris attempted to jump the route but just missed.
  • In the second half, USC QB Cody Kessler found North Western State of Louisiana receiver Ed Eagan for 23 yards. Okahoma outside linebacker Eric Striker had the underneath coverage and South Eastern Louisiana corner Harlan Miller had the bracket over the top. Miller forced Eagan out of bounds.
  • Hargrave and Alabama DL Jarran Reed got blown off the spot for the Kessler qb sneak touchdown.
  • Arkansas QB Brandon Allen found Kansas State H-back Glenn Gronkowski alone for a 32 yard gain. Wisconsin linebacker Joe Schobert had the underneath zone, West Virginia’s K.J. Dillon was one of the deep safeties and missed the tackle. Ohio State safety Tyvis Powell was the other deep man and made the tackle.
  • Alabama running back Kenyan Drake beat Utah defensive end Jason Fanaika to the edge on a pitch for a one yard touchdown
  • On the hail mary, Louisiana Tech quarterback Jeff Driskel found Michigan State receiver Aaron Burbidge for a 26 yard touchdown in front of several defenders at the end of the play. The closest defenders to making the play were Auburn corner Jonathan Jones and William and Mary safety Deandre Houston-Carson.