Scouting Report: Cordrea Tankersley

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By: Shae Dougall

Cordrea Tankersley, CB, Clemson

6’1”, 199lbs

Tankersley

Tape Viewed:

Clemson vs Ohio State (2016)

Clemson vs Virginia Tech (2016)

Clemson vs Troy (2016)

 

OVERVIEW

Nothing really stands out to me about Cordrea Tankersley, except his awesome name. As you read on, you’ll find that I view the former All-American third teamer to be slow to react, stiff, upright, and not particularly good in coverage. Currently projected as a fourth round pick, I wouldn’t touch Tankersley until the sixth round as a project pick. He’s a press corner with a lot of stuff that needs to get coached into him. He was able to get away with his deficiencies at Clemson because of the ridiculous talent around him, but will struggle to make a name for himself in the NFL except in very specific, beneficial circumstances.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 6 out of 10

Tankersley is consistently befuddled by deep routes with a lot of cuts. He might recognize the play, but it’s hard to tell. I’m not confident in his chances to successfully make the leap to the NFL because his reaction time is just too slow.

 

Speed: 3.5 out of 5

Tankersley perplexes me. His combine 40 yard time of 4.4 should speak to excellent straight-line speed, and yet…it doesn’t show up on tape, especially on deep routes. I feel like this indicates some sort of mechanical issue. He definitely seems to play a little bit stiff and upright, which isn’t conducive to maintaining top-level change of direction speed at all times. Until Cordrea can get coached up, a 3.5/5 his speed score shall remain.

 

Mirroring: 7 out of 10

Tankersley can blanket the receiver on just about any quick route, making it difficult on them and occasionally bumping them off of the route completely. This ability scales back the longer he has to cover and deeper the route gets.

 

Pursuit: 3 out of 5

Takes too long to come back to the ball on any route that ends with a hitch, although he does usually make a strong, squared-up tackle in those situations. He can catch up to some guys that have burned him, but usually only when the pass is inaccurately thrown.

 

Man: 8 out of 15

Tankersley has a bad tendency to get beat deep. Even worse, he gets called for pass interference a lot on those plays. He has the size necessary to cover bigger receivers, but the tape indicates that he doesn’t have the speed, despite his 4.4 40 yard dash time at the scouting combine. He also lacks the lower body explosiveness to go up and get the ball in jump ball situations. Finally, Tankersley allows way too much separation on off-coverage routes, failing to quickly close on the ball. This is either due to lack of recognition or lack of athleticism (or both).

 

Zone: 8 out of 15

Whiffed badly in some of the zone situations I watched on tape. On one play, Tankersley was so far out of position that he had to run nearly 8 yards downfield just to get to the receiver…and then he promptly missed the tackle. Simply lacks the instinct and reaction speed necessary to play effective zone coverage.

 

Press: 5 out of 5

I’m most confident in Tankersley when I see that he’s right on the line of scrimmage. Assuming the receiver doesn’t blow him off the line immediately, he’ll be able to compete with them for a while using bump-and-run technique. This almost always causes enough of a problem for the quarterback’s timing to be thrown off, which allows Tankersley to compete for underthrown passes, whether in zone or man coverage.

 

Tackle: 3.5 out of 5

I saw more than one occasion on tape where Tankersley was in position to make the tackle and made the tackle…and then there were some other times where he was in position to make the tackle and missed the tackle. So, he’s basically like a lot of cornerbacks.

 

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Despite mechanical issues and slow reaction time, Tankersley sure did seem to be in the right place at the right time a lot in college. He came away with 8 interceptions with just two years of starting experience at Clemson and he consistently plays the football very well when it’s not going over his head for a huge gain.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 3.5 out of 5

Tankersley won’t be pulverizing guys in the open field too often, but he seems to have the mechanics of tackling down pat. You could certainly do worse at the cornerback position.

 

Play Recognition: 2.5 out of 5

Like on passing plays, Tankersley is often slow to react to a running play. Curtis Samuel made him look foolish on a cutback in the college football playoff, catching Tankersley out of position and blowing by him for a huge gain.

 

Willingness: 5 out of 5

On every running play I saw, Tankersley showed the want-to that a lot of cornerbacks don’t possess at any level. He consistently ran towards where the ball was going, even when it wasn’t close to his side of the field.

 

GENERAL

Injury: 8 out of 10

Missed a couple of games due to injury in 2016, but that might have been due to Clemson’s coaching staff not wanting to risk him aggravating something that was pre-existing (read: resting him because they were playing mediocre South Carolina and something called South Carolina State).

 

Total Prospect Rating: 68/100

Pro Comparison: Jonathan Banks, CB, Chicago Bears

Tankersley 1

Banks

Both have the prototypical size to match up with number one receivers and absolutely lack any further abilities necessary to do so. Whether in zone or man, these players look lost more often than not, though certainly not due to their prototypical size and tantalizing athletic abilities. Banks was a second round pick, a fast-riser following a solid pre-draft season. Tankersley could follow the same path to be horribly over-drafted as teams scramble to make sense of the absolute cluster-f of cornerbacks graded between the second and fourth round. 

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Eagles Seven-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo
Philadelphia_Eagles_logo_primary.svg
13: R1P13: JACK CONKLIN, OT, MICHIGAN STATE
6’6 308 lbs.
Conklin
FIT: Peters is either going to collapse all of his weight on his bad knee or fade into dust at some point within the next couple of seasons, both of which are likely to happen while he’s sitting on a bench avoiding injury. Conklin is insurance in case Lane Johnson never completes the switch to the blind side. Conklin should be able to start right away on either side.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/2001906/jack-conklin
77: R3P14: RYAN KELLY, C/G, ALABAMA
6’4 311 lbs.
Ryan Kelly
FIT: Finding Kelly here in the third is enough reason to snap him up for a team that has an o-line with more leaks than a $400 per month apartment’s piping system. Jason Kelce is the undisputed starter, but Kelly could immediately challenge for a guard spot currently occupied by borderline starters.
NOTE: Kelly’s possibility to fall this far may be due to teams valuing Nick Martin of Notre Dame more. Teams may also question his pass protection since he played in a run-heavy Alabama offense.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1893142/ryan-kelly
79: R3P16: KARL JOSEPH, S, WEST VIRGINIA
5’11 205 lbs.
Joseph
FIT: Malcolm Jenkins is one of the safeties, the other is a big question mark. Walter Thurmond might not be the answer: watching him try to help cover an over-the-hill Calvin Johnson on Thanksgiving was good for some cheap laughs. He’s a UFA anyway. Joseph is a do-everything safety with play-making ability (5 interceptions in 4 games last year).
NOTE: His potential to fall this far is due to his medical, he suffered a season-ending knee injury and was unable to participate in the combine. He may also be knocked for a lack of size.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1983624/karl-joseph
114: R4P15: CHARONE PEAKE, WR, CLEMSON
6’2 209 lbs.
Charone Peake, Justin Hughes

Clemson wide receiver Charone Peake leaps for a pass over South Carolina State’s Justin Hughes during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday Aug. 31, 2013 at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C.(AP Photo/ Richard Shiro)

FIT: Nelson Agholor and Jordan Matthews look to be the top two receivers going forward, but if the drop circus Eagles fans witnessed last year is any indication, this unit is in need of a serious influx of talent. Consider also that Riley Cooper was released and Seyi Ajirotutu is expected to make a significant contribution and this is clearly a disaster zone on the roster.
NOTE: His availability is likely due to his small hands and medical question marks.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1850735/charone-peake
153: R5P14: TAJAE SHARPE, WR, MASSACHUSETTS
6’2 194 lbs.
Sharpe
FIT: Did I mention in the last blurb that Josh Huff is supposed to compete for playing time? Yikes. He’s practice-squad fodder, if at all rosterable. Sharpe should come in immediately and compete for that fourth receiver spot, possibly even third depending on Peake’s medical situation.
164: R5P25: NILE LAWRENCE-STAMPLE, DT, FLORIDA STATE
6’1 320 lbs.
Lawrence-Stample
FIT: This pick is largely contingent on the expectation that the Eagles transition to an attacking 4-3 under new coordinator Jim Schwartz. Before Rex Ryan ruined every Bill’s fans lives by miscasting every Buffalo defensive player, Schwartz used the immense pool of talent to create one of the best pass-rushing units in the league. While he has capable potential starters in Bennie Logan and Cedric Thornton at defensive tackle, there isn’t much depth behind them. Lawrence-Stample projects as a rotational tackle with the ability to swallow double teams and free up the Eagles’ many penetrators.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1860756/nile-lawrence-stample
191: R6P13: TRAVIS FEENEY, OLB, WASHINGTON
6’4 230 lbs.
NCAA FOOTBALL, California at Washington

102613 – SEATTLE, WA – Washington’s Travis Feeney gets to Cal quarterback Jared Goff, dropping him after a 6-yard broken pass play in the first quarter. (UWFOOTBALL27)

FIT: Again assuming a Schwartz-led 4-3, the starters at linebacker are: WLB: Mychal Kendricks (solid), MLB: Kiko Alonso (fantastic), SLB: Jordan Hicks/Connor Barwin (depending on whether they use the Sam in coverage or as more of an enforcer. That considered, the cupboard is largely bare as far as backups go, Feeney has the speed and coverage skills to play Will or fill in at Mike and would be a fun chess piece for a creative coordinator like Schwartz.
NOTE: Feeney is being under-appreciated due to his unusual size, however his combine numbers could open the eyes of some teams. If he falls this far, he’d be a major steal.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1884443/travis-feeney
231: R7P12: JONATHAN WILLIAMS, RB, ARKANSAS
5’11 220 lbs.
J. Williams
FIT: At least one of the starting trio: DeMarco Murray, Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles likely won’t suit up for the Eagles this season. My money is on Murray, since he probably gets off to tape of the Cowboys o-line and is begging Jerry and company to buy him back. Can’t blame him either, as I also get off to tape of the Cowboys o-line. Just magnificent. That aside, Williams is a highly talented back out of Arkansas and the forgotten man in the Alex Collins backfield timeshare. He’s got all the traits teams desire and an injury bad enough to drop him into the seventh round, but not so bad that it could be career threatening. Perfect recipe for a team who can afford to wait for him to heal and develop.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1999948/jonathan-williams
249: R7P30: WR KEYARRIS GARRETT, WR, TULSA
6’3 220 lbs.
Garrett
FIT: And behind Ajirotutu and Huff on the depth chart? Jonathan Krause, Freddie Martino, Xavier Rush and Seantavious Jones, that sounds more like a badminton starting lineup. A triple-dip at receiver doesn’t seem so gratuitous now does it? Besides that, Garrett is a massive player with traits to develop into an impressive talent. He could be the steal of the draft, found at this late stage.
NOTE: Garrett’s only chance of falling this far is if teams are scared by his lack of polish, there are far more accomplished receivers with more refined traits to be had ahead of him, so it is possible.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1877398/keyarris-garrett

A Prospect a Day: 4-3 Defensive Ends, Shaq Lawson Scouting Report

January 15, 2016

A Prospect a Day: This series, launching today, will outline one prospect per day, every day up to the upcoming draft. However, it is entirely possible that some days may feature more than one prospect.

The series will be starting with 4-3 Defensive Ends

SHAQ LAWSON, DE, CLEMSON

6’4 260 lbs

Shaq Lawson

 

OVERVIEW:

Very nice height, weight, speed combination, but probably larger than you’d want from an edge rusher in a 3-4.

Ideal fit is as a 4-3 end, though may even be effective as a 3-4 end due to his strong pocket-pushing ability and well-rounded abilities as a pass rusher and run-stuffer.

Can get sideline-to-sideline when needed and has a relentless motor, often making plays due to sheer effort.

Lacks a versatile arsenal of pass rushing skills, will sometimes use a spin move, but mostly sticks to a swim or bull rush, which is effective due to the massive strength in his lower body.

He’s a strong tackler and usually a strong finisher at the point of attack, which makes him effective even in goal line situations.

Could be an asset on an NFL roster, if not right away then within the first two years, though he has a relatively low ceiling to other prospects available in his range.

PASS RUSHING

Technique: 3 out of 5

Lacks a versatile arsenal of pass rushing moves to go along with his bendability, functional strength, speed, and tackling technique.

Effectiveness: 4 out of 5

The sack numbers (12.5 in 15 games) are plenty impressive as a full-time starter on the edge who constantly sees chips and double teams, he’s a relentless effort guy that makes plays in the backfield more often than not.

Potential: 3 out of 5

Even if he can shore up the pass-rushing technique, he doesn’t possess the explosiveness or first-step quickness of the elite rushers in the NFL and will have a hard time competing against premiere left tackles at the pro level for sacks.

RUN STOPPING

Technique: 3 out of 5

Lawson does a great job in play recognition, but can sometimes fail to set the edge, getting caught up in the backfield and opening lanes for runners.

Effectiveness: 3 out of 5

The 24.5 tackles for loss in 2015 shows Lawson’s strength: he lives in opponents’ backfields. It is also reveals his weakness as he often runs himself right out of plays rather than relying on sound technique to set the edge and hook the runner. His 59 tackles this season were due more to effort and motor than effectiveness in stopping the run.

Potential: 4 out of 5

The good news is, Lawson has all of the functional strength to be an above-average edge setter at the pro level, he just needs to be coached up. I would hesitate to project him as a premiere run stopper unless he puts on a little more weight, since I think he may get bullied by some of the bigger road graders in the NFL like Phil Loadholt, but he should find a nice niche on an NFL roster in this regard as his career progresses.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 20/30

NFL Comparison: Jeremy Mincey, DE, Dallas Cowboys

Lawson

Mincey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Mincey, Lawson thrives as a pass rusher, but possesses the dimensions and leg strength to be an effective edge-setter. They’ll never set the world on fire with their sack numbers but can be a very effective part of nearly any 4-3 defensive rotation.

Projection: Top-15 pick

Mock Draft 1.0 (Picks 6-10)

Thursday March 19, 2015

This article also appears in NFL Draft

6. jets helmet Randy Gregory, OLB, Nebraska

No pressure on the Jets staff to make the playoffs or be fired (like Rex Ryan) allows them to not reach for a QB like Mariota whose question marks as an NFL-level passer don’t fit this range. So instead, defensive-minded head coach Todd Bowles gets a shiny piece of molding clay.

Randy Gregory has all the physical tools to become a dominant edge rusher. He’s not there yet but he will immediately contribute in the run game, Bowles likes to use his corner blitzes for pressure anyway so there’s no rush for Gregory to develop. In this situation, Gregory could reach every bit of his All-Pro potential.

gregory

Don’t pray too hard now, buddy

Height: 6’5

Weight: 235 lbs.

2014 Stats: (missed 2 games) 54 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss, 7 sacks, 1 interception, 1 forced fumble, 3 passes deflected

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: Rotational player/journeyman

Ceiling: Perennial All Pro

NFL Comparison: Barkevious Mingo (OLB Cleveland)- A little on the smaller side for a 3-4 OLB but with elite quickness and overall athleticism, raw and lacking in eye-popping production, all the potential in the world.

7. bears helmet Danny Shelton, DT, Washington

The Bears need help everywhere, literally everywhere. Probably their most solidified position is wide receiver (even after the Brandon Marshall trade). But the Bears failed to replace Henry Melton after he was injured and left for Dallas last year and they also lost Stephen Paea in free agency so an upgrade to the defensive line is in order.

Danny Shelton has traits to match his outrageous production, many scouts have fallen in love with the Washington product as much as we can assume he loves cheeseburgers. Weight has been a problem for Shelton, as has fierce competitiveness, but as an agile space-eater that takes up double teams, there isn’t a better player in this draft.

Danny Shelton

He doesn’t know how he fits through doorways either

Height: 6’2

Weight: 339

2014 Stats: 93 tackles, 16.5 for loss, 9 sacks

Projection: Above-average starter/rotational player

Floor: journeyman/out of league

Ceiling: All Pro

NFL Comparison: Dontari Poe- Has surprising athleticism, bullies lesser competition and eats up double teams consistently. Also a surprising factor in the pass rush.

8. falcons helmet Vic Beasley, DE, Clemson

Falcons need a pass rusher, they have forever (since John Abraham drifted off into the sunset), they tried Osi Umenyiora last year, no dice. They grabbed Brooks Reed (more of a traditional 4-3 OLB) and Adrian Clayborn (mediocre and injured), but Dan Quinn is thankfully smart enough to know the problem isn’t solved.

Watch out for a possible trade for Michael Bennett by the former Seahawks defensive coordinator, but if everyone stays put, Beasley is the best player on the board and fits perfectly as a 4-3 defensive end. He brings the ideal size, supreme athleticism and an impressive array of skills as both a pass-rusher and run-defender. He is the most complete edge player in the draft outside of Dante Fowler, plus he said it would be a dream come true to play for the Falcons. Dreams really do come true.

vic

Look Ma, I’m an airplane

Height: 6’3

Weight: 246

2014 stats: 34 tackles, 21.5 tackles for loss, 12 sacks, 1 fumble return for touchdown, 2 forced fumbles

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: rotational pass rusher

Ceiling: Perennial Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Robert Mathis- Instinctive off the snap, possessing strong finesse pass rush skill set, smaller size for an edge player but possesses ability to set edge and push plays out wide.

9. giants helmet Ereck Flowers, OT, Miami

The Giants have their own one-trick pony pass rusher in JPP and Landon Collins and Bud Dupree don’t fit the range, they went out and grabbed a DT (Kenrick Ellis) in free agency and there’s no inside linebackers worthy of the top 20 picks in this year’s draft. Tom Coughlin is sticking around, which means Eli will still be the quarterback.

All of that in mind, it makes sense to challenge the left tackle spot with a house of a man like Ereck Flowers. Despite being so large, Flowers has swing tackle traits and surprisingly fluid feet. He’s a fast riser in both pass protection and as a mauler. He really is a prototype who could contribute from day 1 and make life easier for the entire Giants offense. As a bonus, he has the size and skills to slide inside and could supplant woeful incumbent guard John Jerry.

ereck flowers

On the goal line and out wide, Flowers really does fit anywhere

Height: 6’6

Weight: 329 lbs.

Projection: Strong starter

Floor: Swing tackle

Ceiling: All Pro

NFL Comparison: Tyron Smith (OT, Dallas Cowboys)- Possesses the quick feet and fluid hips despite the size. Athleticism is strong and a mean streak comes with it. Can road grade when asked but always ascending in pass protection.

10. rams helmet Amari Cooper, WR, Alabama

And all the Rams fans cheered. They finally found their number one receiver, and just in time to help new addition Nick Foles get acquainted with the Rams offense. While Kevin White might have a more ideal frame and more potential, Cooper has a polish and pro-readiness rarely seen from draft prospects. He also had over 1700 yards last year.

Cooper provides a target on all levels of the field, he can win deep, he’ll brave the middle and he can win with quickness on short routes. He’s a coaches’ darling as he is not a diva and actually has quite a reserved demeanor. Though he’s had some issues with drops, he’s a hard worker and NFL coaching will likely help correct that. He’ll be a mainstay in any NFL offense for the next decade.

amari-cooper

Coopering, from the guys who brought you Tebowing

Height: 6’1

Weight: 211 lbs.

2014 stats: 124 catches, 1727 yards, 16 touchdowns

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: High-end WR2

Ceiling: Perennial Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Isaac Bruce (WR, St. Louis Rams)- Can pop the top off a defense or take a short pass to the house, crisp route-runner, loyal, consistent, with strong body control and vision in the open field.