A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Will Fuller Scouting Report

Will Fuller, WR, Notre Dame

6’0 186 lbs.

Fuller

OVERVIEW:

Fuller is more polished and versatile than he gets credit for. Considered by fans and media to be a deep-ball specialist, he actually runs hitches, comebacks, ins and crosses as well. His route running is crisp and quick and his hands are consistent on tape, though he will have a focus-drop now and then.

Still, he’s at his best using his blazing speed and superior athleticism streaking by nearly every college defender unfortunate enough to draw him in coverage. That speed will translate to the NFL and he will be able to make game-breaking plays downfield.

The big problem with Fuller is his small stature, he could get bullied by more physical corners, like Clemson defensive back Mackenzie Alexander was able to do this year when they played. However, Fuller uses his deep speed to force defenders to give him cushion on underneath routes, and he’s willing and able to take a hit to come up with a tough catch.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN:

Hands: 16 out of 20

Fuller has a slight problem with focus drops, but is a solid hands catcher with a wide radius. He also has the ability to make tough catches away from his body.

Route Running: 17 out of 20

Fuller uses his deep speed and crisp cuts to create separation, he just needs to further develop his route tree at the next level.

Blocking: 12 out of 15

Fuller rarely misses a block but doesn’t often show the tenacity or aggressiveness of the better blocking prospects in this draft.

Athleticism: 14 out of 15

He’s definitely the fastest player in this draft with pads on. He also has burst to reach top speed quickly, and leaping ability to finish downfield.

Run after catch: 13 out of 15

Consistently finding extra yards after contact, Fuller has wiggle and speed but not the power or size to frequently finish forward through contact, which holds him back in this regard.

Size: 3 out of 10

Fuller is far too skinny for his own good and must add a little bulk, especially to his legs, to avoid severe injuries in the NFL.

Body Control: 4 out of 5

Able to contort his body on misplaced balls, he’s impressive in this capacity.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 79 out of 100

NFL Player Comparison: Mike Wallace, WR, Vikings

WallaceFuller 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A limited, but effective route-runner, wins with jaw-dropping straight-line speed and impressive short area burst. Both are game-changing threats downfield that are also dangerous on screens and over the middle. Fuller, however, is not a jack ass.

ATTENTION READERS: The conversation doesn’t have to end after the report has been read. Like my thoughts? Take a moment to like my page. We’re on Facebook and Twitter, links below. Think I’m an idiot? Rail on me in the comments. I’m just starting out so any feedback at all is so greatly appreciated.

Also, if you enjoyed this article, maybe you’ll like some of my others. Take a look around the site. I do mostly draft prep but I’ll be getting into some free agency pieces soon. Stay tuned and thanks again for reading.

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Saints 7-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo

Saints logo
12: R1P12: SHELDON RANKINS, DT, LOUISVILLE
6’1 299 lbs.
Louisville Football v Memphis
FIT: Last year, the Saints tried running a 4-3 base defense with Kevin Williams and John Jenkins at starter. While there were times Williams played well, watching Jenkins play was often about as pleasant as I imagine a brain aneurysm to be. The main problem at this position, there is not enough talent. Rankins might be the best in an absolutely loaded class, having turned many senior tackles into human turnstiles at Senior Bowl practices.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1998998/sheldon-rankins
47: R2P16: SHILIQUE CALHOUN, DE, MICHIGAN STATE
6’4 251 lbs.
NCAA Football: Rose Bowl-Stanford vs Michigan State

Jan 1, 2014; Pasadena, CA, USA; Michigan State Spartans defensive end Shilique Calhoun (89) tackles Stanford Cardinal running back Tyler Gaffney (25) during the second half at the Rose Bowl. Mandatory Credit: Richard Mackson-USA TODAY Sports

FIT: Akiem Hicks was so inept for the Saints defense, he was ousted by what could perhaps have been the worst starting 4-3 end in the league: Bobby Richardson. That may be a little harsh, but nobody’s claiming Richardson’s a starter. The Saints must find an answer opposite Cam Jordan and they may not have the cap space to find a starter in free agency. This class is solid at this position at the top, with zero depth.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1868388/shilique-calhoun
78: R3P15: DEION JONES, OLB, LSU
6’1 222 lbs.
Jones
FIT: Watching the Saints attempt to cover a tight end will either make you do a spit-take or cause indigestion, depending on your allegiance. Point being, they can cover a tight end like an umbrella with a hole in it can cover a person in the rain. This was especially prominent in the Tennessee game when the Saints allowed Craig Stevens and Anthony Fasano to combine for 5 catches, 58 yards and a game-winning touchdown in overtime. Jones possesses sideline-to-sideline coverage ability and would inject athleticism and speed into a defense that’s seemingly allergic to the concept.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1984265/deion-jones
113: R4P14: STERLING SHEPARD, WR, OKLAHOMA
5’10 194 lbs.
 Shepard
FIT: Marques Colston is out, and supposedly, Brandon Coleman is the answer. While the big, tall and athletic Coleman looked good in spot duty last year, the Saints need to think about injecting more talent into the receiving corps. I begged the Saints to grab Tyler Lockett last year, now with Shepard falling due to his size and a perceived weakness overall at the position, the Saints would be wise to grab the smooth, polished OU product if he’s available.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1996786/sterling-shepard
152: R5P13: REES ODHIAMBO, G, BOISE STATE
6’4 314 lbs.
 Odiambho
FIT: The Saints just cut ties with long-time starter Jahri Evans, and after jettisoning Ben Grubbs last season, there is very little talent at the position in the building. Depending on what they do in free agency, Sean Payton still counts this as one of the team’s biggest needs. Odhiambo is a talented prospect from outside the Power 5 who could be a steal in the fifth, might remind some fans of a certain Bloomsburg prospect.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1825221/rees-odhiambo
235: R7P16: ANTWAUN WOODS, DT, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
6’0 318 lbs.
Christian Powell, Antwaun Woods, Hayes Pullard

Colorado tailback Christian Powell, center, is tackled for a loss by Southern California linebacker Hayes Pullard, left, and defensive tackle Antwaun Woods (99) in the first quarter of an NCAA college football game in Boulder, Colo., Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ** Usable by LA and DC Only **

FIT: Remember what I said about the Saints situation at defensive tackle? It’s that bad. With the draft so deep at defensive tackle, it makes sense to grab one at this late stage as well, and Woods has a workable frame to go with a high-motor and excellent work ethic. He’ll fit right in with the locker room Payton wants to build and might even find some playing time in a rotational role.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1851134/antwaun-woods

Eagles Seven-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo
Philadelphia_Eagles_logo_primary.svg
13: R1P13: JACK CONKLIN, OT, MICHIGAN STATE
6’6 308 lbs.
Conklin
FIT: Peters is either going to collapse all of his weight on his bad knee or fade into dust at some point within the next couple of seasons, both of which are likely to happen while he’s sitting on a bench avoiding injury. Conklin is insurance in case Lane Johnson never completes the switch to the blind side. Conklin should be able to start right away on either side.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/2001906/jack-conklin
77: R3P14: RYAN KELLY, C/G, ALABAMA
6’4 311 lbs.
Ryan Kelly
FIT: Finding Kelly here in the third is enough reason to snap him up for a team that has an o-line with more leaks than a $400 per month apartment’s piping system. Jason Kelce is the undisputed starter, but Kelly could immediately challenge for a guard spot currently occupied by borderline starters.
NOTE: Kelly’s possibility to fall this far may be due to teams valuing Nick Martin of Notre Dame more. Teams may also question his pass protection since he played in a run-heavy Alabama offense.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1893142/ryan-kelly
79: R3P16: KARL JOSEPH, S, WEST VIRGINIA
5’11 205 lbs.
Joseph
FIT: Malcolm Jenkins is one of the safeties, the other is a big question mark. Walter Thurmond might not be the answer: watching him try to help cover an over-the-hill Calvin Johnson on Thanksgiving was good for some cheap laughs. He’s a UFA anyway. Joseph is a do-everything safety with play-making ability (5 interceptions in 4 games last year).
NOTE: His potential to fall this far is due to his medical, he suffered a season-ending knee injury and was unable to participate in the combine. He may also be knocked for a lack of size.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1983624/karl-joseph
114: R4P15: CHARONE PEAKE, WR, CLEMSON
6’2 209 lbs.
Charone Peake, Justin Hughes

Clemson wide receiver Charone Peake leaps for a pass over South Carolina State’s Justin Hughes during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday Aug. 31, 2013 at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C.(AP Photo/ Richard Shiro)

FIT: Nelson Agholor and Jordan Matthews look to be the top two receivers going forward, but if the drop circus Eagles fans witnessed last year is any indication, this unit is in need of a serious influx of talent. Consider also that Riley Cooper was released and Seyi Ajirotutu is expected to make a significant contribution and this is clearly a disaster zone on the roster.
NOTE: His availability is likely due to his small hands and medical question marks.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1850735/charone-peake
153: R5P14: TAJAE SHARPE, WR, MASSACHUSETTS
6’2 194 lbs.
Sharpe
FIT: Did I mention in the last blurb that Josh Huff is supposed to compete for playing time? Yikes. He’s practice-squad fodder, if at all rosterable. Sharpe should come in immediately and compete for that fourth receiver spot, possibly even third depending on Peake’s medical situation.
164: R5P25: NILE LAWRENCE-STAMPLE, DT, FLORIDA STATE
6’1 320 lbs.
Lawrence-Stample
FIT: This pick is largely contingent on the expectation that the Eagles transition to an attacking 4-3 under new coordinator Jim Schwartz. Before Rex Ryan ruined every Bill’s fans lives by miscasting every Buffalo defensive player, Schwartz used the immense pool of talent to create one of the best pass-rushing units in the league. While he has capable potential starters in Bennie Logan and Cedric Thornton at defensive tackle, there isn’t much depth behind them. Lawrence-Stample projects as a rotational tackle with the ability to swallow double teams and free up the Eagles’ many penetrators.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1860756/nile-lawrence-stample
191: R6P13: TRAVIS FEENEY, OLB, WASHINGTON
6’4 230 lbs.
NCAA FOOTBALL, California at Washington

102613 – SEATTLE, WA – Washington’s Travis Feeney gets to Cal quarterback Jared Goff, dropping him after a 6-yard broken pass play in the first quarter. (UWFOOTBALL27)

FIT: Again assuming a Schwartz-led 4-3, the starters at linebacker are: WLB: Mychal Kendricks (solid), MLB: Kiko Alonso (fantastic), SLB: Jordan Hicks/Connor Barwin (depending on whether they use the Sam in coverage or as more of an enforcer. That considered, the cupboard is largely bare as far as backups go, Feeney has the speed and coverage skills to play Will or fill in at Mike and would be a fun chess piece for a creative coordinator like Schwartz.
NOTE: Feeney is being under-appreciated due to his unusual size, however his combine numbers could open the eyes of some teams. If he falls this far, he’d be a major steal.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1884443/travis-feeney
231: R7P12: JONATHAN WILLIAMS, RB, ARKANSAS
5’11 220 lbs.
J. Williams
FIT: At least one of the starting trio: DeMarco Murray, Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles likely won’t suit up for the Eagles this season. My money is on Murray, since he probably gets off to tape of the Cowboys o-line and is begging Jerry and company to buy him back. Can’t blame him either, as I also get off to tape of the Cowboys o-line. Just magnificent. That aside, Williams is a highly talented back out of Arkansas and the forgotten man in the Alex Collins backfield timeshare. He’s got all the traits teams desire and an injury bad enough to drop him into the seventh round, but not so bad that it could be career threatening. Perfect recipe for a team who can afford to wait for him to heal and develop.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1999948/jonathan-williams
249: R7P30: WR KEYARRIS GARRETT, WR, TULSA
6’3 220 lbs.
Garrett
FIT: And behind Ajirotutu and Huff on the depth chart? Jonathan Krause, Freddie Martino, Xavier Rush and Seantavious Jones, that sounds more like a badminton starting lineup. A triple-dip at receiver doesn’t seem so gratuitous now does it? Besides that, Garrett is a massive player with traits to develop into an impressive talent. He could be the steal of the draft, found at this late stage.
NOTE: Garrett’s only chance of falling this far is if teams are scared by his lack of polish, there are far more accomplished receivers with more refined traits to be had ahead of him, so it is possible.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1877398/keyarris-garrett

A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Josh Doctson Scouting Report

Josh Doctson, WR, TCU

6’3 195 lbs.

Doctson

Watching his tape is an absolute pleasure. During this season, you’ll hear a lot of teams talking about finding guys that check off all the boxes and Doctson is absolutely one of those guys.

Just as impressive downfield as he is as a possession receiver over the middle, Doctson has the ability to chameleon into any role and be a meaningful contributor immediately at the next level. He can climb the ladder, plays the ball at its highest point beautifully, runs crafty routes and can out-physical just about any defensive back.

As if that weren’t enough, he’s also one of the best blockers I’ve ever evaluated. He sprung four touchdowns with his blocks on the tape I saw. He’s constantly hustling back to the play to contribute and clearly has a team-first mentality.

The only slight knock I have on him is he needs to gain more yards after the catch consistently. He doesn’t quite have the world class speed or freakish size either. But he will be a brilliant pro, no doubt. And the team that drafts him will have found a WR2 for the ages.

Hands: 18 out of 20

Doctson rarely drops a ball, and when he does, it’s usually while he’s several feet in the air or contorting his body in some way. He must work on being a more consistent hands-catcher as he lets some reach into his body.

Route Running: 16 out of 20

He doesn’t have the razor-sharp cuts of the great route runners, but makes up for it with a strong understanding of how to play his assignments like a fiddle. Still, better cutting would make creating separation easier.

Blocking: 15 out of 15

Simply spectacular in this regard. Doctson’s technique, effort and all-around effectiveness as a blocker make him stand out constantly on film.

Athleticism: 14 out of 15

He might have the best vertical in the class, he generates a ton of force from his legs. He’ll probably also run a solid 40, shows above-average acceleration and burst to go with average NFL speed.

Run after catch: 11 out of 15

The one part of his game he really needs to improve as a pro, Doctson is too content to fall forward for a couple of extra yards rather than maintain balance and fight for more.

Size: 7 out of 10

He’s clearly not fully grown into his frame, could use more weight in the midsection as he is extremely tapered.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

Shows ridiculous ability to contort himself, leap for high balls and maintain composure through contact.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 86 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Michael Floyd, WR, Arizona Cardinals

FloydDoctson 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possessing similar frames, both dominate at the point of the catch, using savvy route-running and impressive athleticism to high-point the ball on deep throws. Both also possess the toughness and willingness to run a full route tree, including routes over the middle. As a bonus, both are standout blockers as well.

A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Corey Coleman Scouting Report

Corey Coleman, WR, Baylor

5’10 190 lbs.

Coleman

Baylor receiver Corey Coleman (1) brings in the catch amongst a West Virginia defender during the first quarter of a NCAA college football game on Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015 at McLane Stadium in Waco, TX. Baylor won 62-38.

OVERVIEW

Coleman is a diminutive, explosive playmaker with solid route running and at-times spectacular hands.

His blocking and outside receiving ability are both limited by his size, however he is still winning to go up for jump balls and inside on both runs and crossing routes.

He’s also a strong runner out of the backfield, lining up as a running back, rushing off tackle and counters; true running back plays.

His greatest asset, however, is his deep-ball tracking ability. He can run right by defenders and under deep throws with little apparent effort.

He must learn how to use his athleticism more on tight coverage and be able to use the elusiveness he showed against West Virginia to realize his full potential.

Receiver Breakdown:

Hands: 18 out of 20

He’s a gifted hands catcher who rarely has focus drops and often comes up with effortless catches downfield. His main problem is when he has to reach for balls outside his catch radius.

Route Running: 16 out of 20

Most of his routes are crisp, but he doesn’t run a full route tree due to the Baylor offense limiting his opportunities.

Blocking: 11 out of 15

His size limits his effectiveness, he also lacks consistent effort when the play is away from him, even walking and stopping entirely while a play is still going.

Athleticism: 13 out of 15

His speed and agility are off the charts. His jumping ability looks solid, not spectacular.

Run after catch: 15 out of 15

He can take short passes to the house and almost always finds positive yards after the catch. His play against West Virginia in this regard was transcendent

Size: 3 out of 10

Not only is he small and short, it limits his effectiveness noticeably. It clearly keeps him from being in the conversation for best prospect in this draft.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

His ability to dip in and out of cuts and maintain balance is eye-opening, to say the least.

Total Prospect Rating: 81/100

NFL Comparison: Golden Tate, WR, Lions

TateColeman 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the hands, route running and quickness to dominate from the slot, Coleman compares favorably to Tate who has made a living in the NFL burning defenses both deep and after the catch on underneath routes. Both have also proven to be effective runners out of the backfield, though Coleman is probably already more gifted in this aspect.

A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Michael Thomas Scouting Report

Michael Thomas, WR, Ohio State

6’3 210 lbs

Thomas

OVERVIEW

Thomas is the classic example of wasted potential. He’s a true NFL receiver with dominant traits who has the ability to run a full route tree and the savvy and athleticism to dominate against both man and zone.

However, he was criminally underused in the Ohio State offense by quarterbacks incapable of putting him in favorable positions consistently. It’s very clear that defenses respected his immense ability as he constantly drew flags and double coverage.

Still, there are a couple of knocks on Thomas’ game: he has uneven hands, especially on contested balls and he doesn’t seem to have the demeanor or swagger of a number one receiver.

He’s also an extremely skilled blocker.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN

Hands: 14 out of 20

Thomas shows the ability to catch nearly any ball when he’s coming back to it. When running away from the ball, he shows much more inconsistency. While he’s willing to fight through contact. He doesn’t use his superior frame and athleticism nearly well enough to go up and snag contested balls.

Route Running: 17 out of 20

His route running isn’t quite razor-sharp, but it’s adequate to create separation and he shows the ability to read zones and sit in the soft spots to make a QB-friendly target.

Blocking: 14 out of 15

Thomas consistently shines in blocking situations, springing runners for big gains several times per game. He shows incredible latching ability and awareness to disengage at the right time. He’s, however, not quite aggressive enough if the play is shifting away from him.

Athleticism: 14 out of 15

I fully expect Thomas to be among the leaders at the position at the combine. He clearly has excellent long-speed and agility. Though he doesn’t use it often, he also has excellent jumping ability. The main problem is he doesn’t often use these traits to dominate competition like one would expect.

Run after catch: 14 out of 15

Look no further than a hitch Thomas took to the house against Rutgers. He slid between two defenders and delivered a punishing stiff-arm to spring free for the touchdown. On that play, he showed all the major traits: speed, power and vision, which will allow him to dominate on the next level with the ball in his hands.

Size: 9 out of 10

He’s big and tall, ideal for his position, though he could stand to add a bit more weight in his legs, he looks a little bit lanky at times.

Body Control: 3 out of 5

Though he shows strong ability to break tackles with proper pad level through contact, he’s not able to contort his body in ways that allow him to win on downfield throws.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 85 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Julio Jones, WR, Falcons

JulioThomas 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He may be one of the best receivers in the league, but Thomas has nearly an identical frame with the same combination of athleticism, strength, savvy and crisp route-running that has made Jones such a matchup nightmare. Thomas must improve his hands and ability to win the contested catch, but could have a Jones-like impact.

A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers: Laquon Treadwell Scouting Report

Laquon Treadwell, WR, Ole Miss

6’2 210 lbs.

Treadwell

OVERVIEW

The single greatest weapon Treadwell has in his arsenal is his ability to win 50-50 balls. He not only does this effectively and consistently, he often makes the extreme look routine and mundane. He can also high point the ball better than most college corners.

While he is not a spectacular athlete by the NFL’s lofty standards, he should test well at the combine. He carries his pads and frame impressively, allowing abnormal body control when going up for contested catches.

Treadwell is a somewhat lazy route runner, not making precise cuts. This stymies his ability to create separation. He also struggles with proper form in blocking, though he is incredibly aggressive and willing in that area of his game.

The biggest thing he can do at the next level to improve is to study: his awareness of defensive concepts is clearly lacking as he can constantly be seen taking himself out of the play in zone coverages, rather than sitting in the soft spots. He’s an absolute mismatch for most corners in man coverage though and demands extra defensive attention constantly.

He has the demeanor and confidence required of a number one receiver to go along with solid size.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN

Hands: 17 out of 20

While Treadwell made some ridiculous catches on tape, and only had one true drop, he missed on some difficult but catchable balls. One that really stood out was a slightly overthrown deep ball late in a 2015 blowout by Florida.

Route Running: 12 out of 20

He must improve this facet of his game to be a truly elite prospect. He doesn’t often look like he cares to try to create separation and will be feasted on by the NFL’s feistier corners for this.

Blocking: 13 out of 15

He’s brilliantly effective as a blocker downfield, though he lacks the short area quickness to handle blocking when the corner is in press coverage. He’s extremely aggressive and will often block right through the whistle. He has a good understanding of when to disengage and switch his man as well.

Athleticism: 13 out of 15

He’s a phenomenal athlete when all factors are taken into account. He can do pretty much anything asked of him on a football field, outrun or jump over defenses and even has the ability to rush and throw when called upon. He just won’t put up numbers that dazzle at the combine.

Run after catch: 14 out of 15

He has both the elusiveness and power to be an absolute nightmare in the open field. While he doesn’t often convert short throws to touchdowns, he’s almost never taken down for no gain after the catch and that speaks volumes to his ability.

Size: 8 out of 10

His frame is strong and compact, but in an era of big, tall receivers, he’s not quite the physical freak teams covet.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

His ability to twist and contort himself to make a catch pops on tape constantly.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Allen Robinson, WR, Jaguars

RobinsonTreadwell 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The breakout star for the Jags represents the pinnacle of Treadwell’s potential. Both are strong athletes with great hands who need improvement in route running and rely on muscle and ability to battle defensive backs.

 

ATTENTION READERS: The conversation doesn’t have to end after the report has been read. Like my thoughts? Take a moment to like my page. We’re on Facebook and Twitter, links below. Think I’m an idiot? Rail on me in the comments. I’m just starting out so any feedback at all is so greatly appreciated.

Also, if you enjoyed this article, maybe you’ll like some of my others. Take a look around the site. I do mostly draft prep but I’ll be getting into some free agency pieces soon. Stay tuned and thanks again for reading.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

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A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Kenneth Dixon Scouting Report

Kenneth Dixon, RB, Louisiana Tech

6’0 216 lbs.

Dixon

OVERVIEW

Dixon is a stout, savvy and well-built runner that got better with every year of experience at Tech. He really emerged in 2015 when Driskel came over to start from Florida since prior to that, Dixon was the only offensive weapon for Tech.

Dixon, as a runner, prefers to get up-field quickly and take the first lane he finds. Once in the secondary, he becomes a little more creative and uses the field laterally. He has a brilliant spin move and a solid stiff arm to go with a wiggly juke.

Where Dixon really shines though is in the receiving game. He’s the best pure receiving back among the top prospects. He runs a full route tree with crisp precision and makes, at times, ridiculous catches. He’s a natural catcher and has exceptional sideline awareness.

He also has a great feel for setting up blocks and bouncing off tackles in the open field. He set the FBS record for most touchdowns in a career by a running back with 87.

RUSHING

Speed: 2 out of 5

Dixon is a rumbler, he makes his money with speed in the open field and does not possess great burst. His top-end speed is mostly average though and it could limit runs at the next level.

Power: 3 out of 5

He lowers his shoulder with the best of them and runs with great pad level, but he doesn’t seek out contact.

Field Vision: 12 out of 15

His vision is strong once he reaches the open field but struggles at the line of scrimmage. This is also why he’s incredibly effective as a pass catcher.

Balance: 7 out of 10

Dixon is able to keep his feet through contact but has no plays that really stand out and make you notice on tape.

Break Tackle: 6 out of 10

While he sometimes bounces off tacklers and runs through contact, he’s easily taken down in the open field with good form one-on-one.

Moves: 5 out of 5

He has an impressive spin move to go with a devastating stiff arm. He works in the hurdle and constantly uses a short juke to get in between defenders.

Run blocking: 3 out of 5

He has a natural feel for run blocking and has the body for it, but Driskel didn’t take off much for the Tech offense.

RECEIVING

Route running: 5 out of 5

Dixon runs a full route tree with elite-receiver-prospect precision.

Hands: 10 out of 10

With 33 catches in his senior year, including some absurd one-handed grabs and not a drop on tape, he looks as sure-handed as they come.

Run after catch: 5 out of 5

His 14.1 average per catch is absolutely absurd and his seven receiving touchdowns on just 33 catches mean that he scored 21% of the time he caught the ball. Almost one in every four catches was a score. Ridiculous.

Blocking: 4 out of 5

He plays like a natural and could probably be a tight end with his abilities as a run blocker. He stays away from perfect just by a lack of plays to review.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 5 out of 5

Dixon is highly aggressive and stout at the point of attack. He loves hitting pass rushers and keeping them down and often takes an extra pop on them at the end of the play.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

He gave up no sacks on tape and only once was a rusher close, he never missed a block either.

Potential: 10 out of 10

His size, skill set and aggression suggest he will be able to handle the better rushers in the NFL.

Total Prospect Rating: 82/100

NFL Comparison: Fred Jackson, RB, Seahawks

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Makes his money in the NFL as a versatile receiving threat. Both are incredible in the open field, and effective enough between the tackles to work as starters when called upon. Dixon might be even better than Jackson when all is said and done.

A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Devontae Booker Scouting Report

Devontae Booker, RB, Utah

5’11 212 lbs

Assigntment 4

Utah Utes running back Devontae Booker (23) runs the ball into the end zone for a touchdown during the third quarter. The No. 5 Oregon Ducks play the No. 20 Utah Utes at Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah on November 8, 2014. (Taylor Wilder/Emerald)

Booker lacks elite running characteristics and tends to prefer running north-south to lateral movement. He does possess a devastating spin and shows adequate elusiveness in the open field.

His speed is only slightly above average but he does a fantastic job bursting through a crease for the maximum gain on a given play. He’ll need a strong offensive line at the next level since he isn’t much of a creator behind the line of scrimmage.

He has strong natural ability as a receiver out of the backfield that should keep him on the field for most offensive plays. He looks like an adequate runner, but perhaps a 1b option, if not a backup altogether.

He probably needs to put on some more weight to get more goal-to-go opportunities. His touchdown numbers were comparatively low versus the other top prospects at the position.

RUSHING

Speed: 4 out of 5

Booker replaces a lack of elite top-end speed with a strong burst and suddenness to his game that allows him to slide through even the smallest creases, and if a team’s secondary is even a step slow, he has enough speed to turn a run into the secondary into a touchdown like he did twice against Arizona State in 2015.

Power: 3 out of 5

He runs with plenty of aggressiveness, but it’s not his main weapon as a runner, preferring to slide by potential tacklers versus seeking out contact.

Field Vision: 12 out of 15

Booker uses an elite understanding of blocks at the line of scrimmage to rarely get stuffed but struggles at times once he gets past the first wave.

Balance: 9 out of 10

Booker’s balance is special, and at times it looks like it might be the best in the draft. He’s constantly picking up extra yards while stumbling facedown to the ground.

Break Tackle: 7 out of 10

He’s a strong runner, but again power isn’t the main part of his gain, and because of this, wrangling him around the ankles isn’t as difficult as it would be if he squared up into contact.

Moves: 4 out of 5

Booker has the best spin move in the class and uses it brilliantly and constantly. He also has a strong juke to go with the occasional hurdles and stiff arms.

Run blocking: 4 out of 5

This wasn’t a huge part of his game, but he did show some strong ability, especially in games which Kendall Thompson started.

RECEIVING

Route running: 4 out of 5

Booker actually has some diversity to his route-running game and is quite decisive and accurate.

Hands: 9 out of 10

There were no drops on tape, and he managed a few one-handers as well, this is only imperfect because he had under 40 catches in 2015.

Run after catch: 5 out of 5

He had an average of over 8 yards a catch and showed some good ability in the open field. Especially notable, his longest reception in the game was only less than 10 yards once and in seven of his ten games played in 2015 he had a reception of 20 yards or more.

Blocking: 3 out of 5

He didn’t see much action in this capacity on tape, but he never showed any sign of taking plays off so it’s likely if the play were to shift to his side, he’d throw some effective blocks.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 4 out of 5

A bit undersized, Booker can get overtaken by powerful rushers but makes up for it with good foot and hand usage and a solid cut block.

Effectiveness: 3 out of 5

Booker has trouble committing and that gets his QB in trouble sometimes, but when he properly identifies his assignment, he doesn’t typically give ground.

Potential: 9 out of 10

If Booker works on his assignments, he should have no big issues blocking at the next level.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 80/100

NFL Comparison: Pierre Thomas, RB, Redskins

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Both have excellent balance and burst to maximize short gains and the feel and hands in the open field to be magnificent screen backs. Thomas has made a living being a jack-of-all-trades in the pros and I think Booker will do the same since his running ability by itself isn’t quite elite.

A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Alex Collins Scouting Report

Alex Collins, RB, Arkansas

5’11 215 lbs

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Collins has quicker feet than most running backs ever will. His change of direction ability is automatic and his stop-and-start movement jumps off tape.

He is quick, agile, has adequate burst for longer plays and brilliant vision to set up his blockers. He benefited from running behind an exceptional Arkansas offensive line headlined by top-NFL-prospect Guard Sebastian Tretola.

Still, when it came to contact, Collins seeks it out and hits with a ton of power and aggression. When he really gets going, he lowers his shoulders and plows through contact with the best of them. This is especially impressive considering his relatively low weight.

He’ll probably have to bulk up a bit for the NFL but it’s all well-distributed.

Speed: 3 out of 5

Collins can get around the edge or downhill quickly and with speed, but he can get chased down by linebackers or slower safeties from schools with more talent. He had his most special games against lesser competition for the most part.

Power: 5 out of 5

He’s a guy that seems to love getting hit and delivering it right back. While he has nifty feet, once he chooses his direction, he’s like a runaway freight train.

Field Vision: 15 out of 15

Collins’ field vision was consistently a defining characteristic on his successful gains, he would weave in and out of several lanes using the entire field at his disposal like few others can. He has traits of both a north-south and lateral runner and can do both effectively, often in the same run.

Balance: 9 out of 10

Has some absolutely insane moments in this regard, a few times against Tennessee he was forced parallel to the ground with all of his weight forward and still managed five extra yards and a first down. Shows this same impressive ability when stopping and starting as his momentum doesn’t carry him forward and he’s able to get going immediately rather than lumbering.

Break Tackle: 8 out of 10

Collins shows impressive ability in this area of his game, he can carry several tacklers several yards if they don’t hit him with good form. He’s stronger with good pad level and as a result, when he’s deep in the secondary, he’s easier to bring down since he runs a little too high.

Moves: 5 out of 5

Everything is utilized in Collins’ game, and with the expertise of a wily vet. His feet are so quick that his spin is almost as quick as his juke and he uses the hurdle against opponents’ tendencies to try to chop his legs in the open field since he’s such a tough runner to bring down.

Run blocking: 3 out of 5

He wasn’t asked to do this much at Arkansas but if his pass blocking skills are any indication, he should at least be adequate.

RECEIVING

Route running: 3 out of 5

Collins runs the screen well, but that’s about it. Still, most NFL teams probably won’t ask much more of him, and even if they do, he has the traits to develop well in this aspect (quick feet)

Hands: 6 out of 10

He had 13 catches in his senior season, so there’s just not enough data to make a solid determination. I have it somewhat low because I saw a drop on the only pass that went his way in the tape I watched, though it was well-covered.

Run after catch: 2 out of 5

His 13 catches in his senior season went for only 95 yards, that’s an average of 7.3 yards per catch which was the highest of his college career by almost two yards. He has the traits to be explosive but it just didn’t show up while he was at Arkansas.

Blocking: 3 out of 5

He didn’t run very many routes, but when he did, he was active and effective in attempting to give his receivers running lanes.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 5 out of 5

Collins uses his compact frame to be very stout at the point of attack and rebounds most rushers with ease. He shows good recognition skills and rarely gets out leveraged.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

There were no issues with his pass protection on tape.

Potential: 10 out of 10

He shows the ability to use his slight lack of size to his advantage and should continue to be stout on the next level.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82/100

NFL Comparison: DeAngelo Williams, RB, Steelers

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Runs with a great mix of brute strength and nifty movement skills. Possesses the necessary burst to pull away from defenders in the open field and balance to stretch gains far beyond expectation. Williams is a more accomplished pass catcher, but everything that makes him effective in that role, Collins seems to possess.