Scouting Report: Mitch Trubisky

By: Shae Dougall

Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina

6’2”, 222lbs

Trubisky

Tape Viewed:

North Carolina vs Stanford (2016)

North Carolina vs Florida State (2016)

North Carolina vs Miami (2016)

 

OVERVIEW

Mitchell Trubisky (also known as #MitchNotMitchell) is the young, talented up-and-coming quarterback out of North Carolina who is likely to fly up draft boards on draft day due to his immense talent, big arm, lack of injury history, intangibles, and a bunch of other things that NFL GMs moan about in their sleep. In my opinion, Mitch is being underrated in the draft process, as I think he could eventually develop into a Diet Aaron Rodgers type of player (more on that later).


Mitch is also technically a dual-threat QB who ran a boatload of read option plays in college, so he’d be well-suited to go to a team that is willing to let him tote the ball a bit, because he has a lot of experience in that area. As a result of these read option plays, Mitch will need to learn how to drop back in a proper, traditional NFL offense, but there’s no reason he can’t be successful as we recently saw Derek Carr and Marcus Mariota excellently transition from shotgun shotfun to taking snaps from under center. The key for Mitch is landing spot, he’ll need to find a situation where he can continue to develop. If he’s forced to start right away, I fear a worse fate than the perennially underwhelming Ryan Tannehill. Though again, this is not a knock on Mitch’s talent level, but rather his relative inexperience as a signal caller.

 

PASSING

 

Accuracy: 12.5 out of 15

Short- No issues on any quick routes or screens.

Intermediate- The first tape I watched had Mitch hitting an 18 yard streaking receiver into the endzone between two defenders. The window was fairly tight, and taught me all I needed to know about Mitch’s willingness to throw into coverage and to do so with excellent accuracy. Another note: Mitch completes 62.1% of his intermediate passes, easily outstripping other QBs in this class. I also saw him throw behind a receiver and throw a pretty bad interception, so

Deep- Mitch has a big enough arm and throws with enough velocity to consistently attempt the deep pass, but he’ll need to work on his accuracy in this area. He overthrew receivers a lot, which is at least better than underthrowing.

 

Power: 5 out of 5

Mitch has a big arm. There is no denying that. The ball explodes out of his hand with jaw-dropping velocity. I actually wonder if he can put consistent touch on his passes, but that’s a concern for a different category.

 

On the run: 5 out of 5

Mitch is absolutely brilliant on the run. I saw quite a few opportunities at the end of the Stanford game where he had to escape the rush and then make off balance intermediate-length throws without setting his feet…and he nailed every one of them. Unfortunately, almost all of them were dropped by the receivers!

 

Consistency: 7.5 out of 10

It was a little concerning that Mitch only started for one full season of his entire college career, and the team wasn’t particularly great during his tenure as the starter. This is a very hard category to judge because of the lack of data and tape to go off of, but it’s definitely concerning that he can complete 81.5% of his passes at Florida State and then hit under 40% at home against Virginia Tech the very next week! What the heck?

Generally, though, Mitch had a great season and very few head-scratching games. I’ll give him what I believe to be a fair score for a strong season.

 

Field General: 17.5 out of 20

Arguable the most important category for any quarterback is his ability to read the field and understand where pressure is coming from, in addition to understanding where the ball needs to be placed. Mitch is solid in both categories, making up for his slight blitz reading deficiencies with exceptional read quickness. He is very, very good at determining the assignments of downfield safeties, and I trust him to not make too many crushing mistakes. With just one year of starting experience, Mitch has so far shown tremendous potential to get even better.

 

Athleticism: 4 out of 5

Great speed and lower body explosiveness to get away from oncoming defensive ends. Frequently ran read option plays out of shotgun, so he clearly has the ability to outspeed slower defensive edge players and break through weak tackle attempts.

 

Pocket awareness: 8 out of 10

Competent in the pocket by any definition, but it remains to be seen whether or not Mitch has the ability to drop back in a traditional NFL offense, since 100% of his college snaps came out of the shotgun.

 

Poise: 10 out of 10

Mitch is consistently ready to go in any and all pressure situations. He can dodge defenders and make plays down the field with flair and spectacular awareness.

 

Clutch: 4 out of 5

Came up just short against Stanford in the Sun Bowl, but did have a spectacular final drive that featured no fewer than 4 dropped touchdown passes and terrible offensive line work. Lost close games against Duke and NC State (tape not viewed), but engineered a terrific game-winning drive against Florida State early in the season.

 

Size: 4 out of 5

Mitch has decent height at 6’2”. Plays at an appropriate weight for his height.

 

Reliability: 9.5 out of 10

Mitch is tough both mentally and physically, never missing a game due to injury or choking under pressure due to mental fatigue. Despite only being 6’2”, he plays much bigger than his advertised size, and probably won’t suffer too many early NFL career wear-and-tear related injuries since he rode the bench for much of his college tenure.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 87/100

 

Pro Comparison: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers

Trubisky 1

Rodgers

Okay, don’t freak out. I know that there is almost no way that Mitch will reach the career heights of Aaron Rodgers. But the category says to look for similarities in play styles and the number one thing that sticks out to me is how much Mitch is willing to gun the ball in there every single time. Seriously, the ball explodes out of his hands and he has great short and intermediate accuracy. Both players stand 6’2” and have the same playing weight. Both have outstanding read-the-field ability. WHAT MORE COULD YOU POSSIBLY ASK FOR? Can you tell I love the prospect of Mitch Trubisky under center for an NFL franchise? Time shall tell if he works out, but my money is on Mr. Ohio.

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Scouting Report: DeShone Kizer

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DeShone Kizer, QB, Notre Dame

6’4 233 lbs.

Kizer

Tape Viewed: 2015 vs. Stanford, 2015 vs. Ohio State, 2016 vs. Texas, 2016 vs. Michigan State, 2016 vs. Miami

 

OVERVIEW

I’ve had the pleasure to watch every single start of DeShone Kizer’s Notre Dame career and this kid was perhaps the most precocious starter in his first season that I’ve ever seen. His deep accuracy, dropping dimes to current Houston Texans wide receiver Will Fuller especially, was jaw-dropping. He complimented that with a poise and moxie that rivaled NFL veterans.

People forget that Kizer led a comeback and was within a two-point conversion of knocking off Clemson in 2015 (Clemson would go on to be undefeated until the National Championship). This was all with a relative lack of NFL talent surrounding him, and a very poor defense that he was forced to make up for week in and week out.

2016 was more of the same for Kizer, except with a worse defense, and replacing Will Fuller with some tall guy named Equanimeous St. Brown. The point being, the talent around him got even worse, and he felt the pressure to will his poor team to wins. The struggles were predictable, and partly the fault of Kizer for setting his original bar so high. Kizer’s 2016 season is a very difficult study because it was such an unstable situation all year in South Bend.

 

PASSING

 

Accuracy: 12 out of 15

Kizer is the most accurate deep passer in this draft, and his accuracy on deep passes rivals anyone in the NFL. He has unbelievable touch to drop it to deep streaking receivers in stride. Kizer also flashes incredible accuracy on intermediate and short throws, but has strange lapses that could potentially be due to his inconsistent footwork and incredibly live arm.

 

Power: 4 out of 5

Can throw a heat-seeking missile at times: look no further than the Texas game with Kizer throwing to receiver Torri Hunter Jr. between 3 defenders. However, there are strange lapses in which Kizer’s velocity on short and intermediate throws fizzles.

 

On the run: 5 out of 5

Kizer can run off to the left, or the right, and throw an accurate ball without setting his feet. He can reach any area of the field, or work the sideline. It’s pretty incredible.

 

Consistency: 7 out of 10

This rating should seemingly be lower, with the huge disparity in wins from year one as a starter to year two. However, Kizer himself doesn’t see many drop offs in his overall game. The talent around him is often what lets him down. You’ll see this constantly, especially in the 2016 tape where three of the starters on his offensive line have no business being on the field.

 

Field General: 17 out of 20

Works through his reads quickly and naturally. Very decisive when he sees what he likes. He does have a tendency to tuck and run rather than take an easy underneath completion, but it really depends on the flow of the game. When Kizer is in a rhythm, he’s as decisive as you could ask for and usually gets it to the right guy.

 

Athleticism: 5 out of 5

For a player his size, he’s an incredibly fluid and natural athlete. He flashes impressive balance against the blitz, weaves in and out of run lanes with ease and can get skinny or even vertical when seeking the pylon on a rushing TD attempt.

 

Pocket awareness: 8 out of 10

Kizer is never taken unaware. He feels pressure immediately and slides in the pocket with very sudden moves. The problem is that he sometimes doesn’t trust his protection which causes him to feel pressure when it isn’t quite there.

 

Poise: 9 out of 10

Much more often than not, Kizer thrives under pressure. He can deliver a pinpoint accurate ball from any number of contorted poses, and he loves to stretch a defense on a broken-down play.

 

Clutch: 4 out of 5

All of Kizer’s biggest games of his career feature solid to outstanding individual performances by him. In fact, his game against Stanford in 2015 for a CFB Playoff bid was perhaps the best of his career. The knock though, is he lost that game, and the bowl game against Ohio State, and the game against Clemson. It’s a slight concern.

 

Size: 5 out of 5

He is the quarterback prototype, in every single way.

 

Reliability: 9 out of 10

Kizer is sturdy, he doesn’t get banged up despite his very physical style of play. The only slight concern here is the issues he had with Coach Brian Kelly at Notre Dame and why he never quite seemed to get the keys to the Ferrari, so to speak.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 85 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Randall Cunningham, QB, Retired

Kizer 1

Cunningham

This comparison comes with a slight caveat: this is the Vikings’ Randall Cunningham, later in his career when he allowed his exceptional natural abilities as a passer to shine through. Cunningham and Kizer share that uncanny ability to deliver perfect passes running off to the left and right. They’re both outstanding natural runners that thrive on deep ball accuracy but flash accuracy to all areas of the field. Most of all, both appear to be very difficult to rattle and are borderline-unstoppable when in a rhythm. They also both happen to be prototype physical specimens.

 

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Mock Draft 1.0 (Picks 6-10)

Thursday March 19, 2015

This article also appears in NFL Draft

6. jets helmet Randy Gregory, OLB, Nebraska

No pressure on the Jets staff to make the playoffs or be fired (like Rex Ryan) allows them to not reach for a QB like Mariota whose question marks as an NFL-level passer don’t fit this range. So instead, defensive-minded head coach Todd Bowles gets a shiny piece of molding clay.

Randy Gregory has all the physical tools to become a dominant edge rusher. He’s not there yet but he will immediately contribute in the run game, Bowles likes to use his corner blitzes for pressure anyway so there’s no rush for Gregory to develop. In this situation, Gregory could reach every bit of his All-Pro potential.

gregory

Don’t pray too hard now, buddy

Height: 6’5

Weight: 235 lbs.

2014 Stats: (missed 2 games) 54 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss, 7 sacks, 1 interception, 1 forced fumble, 3 passes deflected

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: Rotational player/journeyman

Ceiling: Perennial All Pro

NFL Comparison: Barkevious Mingo (OLB Cleveland)- A little on the smaller side for a 3-4 OLB but with elite quickness and overall athleticism, raw and lacking in eye-popping production, all the potential in the world.

7. bears helmet Danny Shelton, DT, Washington

The Bears need help everywhere, literally everywhere. Probably their most solidified position is wide receiver (even after the Brandon Marshall trade). But the Bears failed to replace Henry Melton after he was injured and left for Dallas last year and they also lost Stephen Paea in free agency so an upgrade to the defensive line is in order.

Danny Shelton has traits to match his outrageous production, many scouts have fallen in love with the Washington product as much as we can assume he loves cheeseburgers. Weight has been a problem for Shelton, as has fierce competitiveness, but as an agile space-eater that takes up double teams, there isn’t a better player in this draft.

Danny Shelton

He doesn’t know how he fits through doorways either

Height: 6’2

Weight: 339

2014 Stats: 93 tackles, 16.5 for loss, 9 sacks

Projection: Above-average starter/rotational player

Floor: journeyman/out of league

Ceiling: All Pro

NFL Comparison: Dontari Poe- Has surprising athleticism, bullies lesser competition and eats up double teams consistently. Also a surprising factor in the pass rush.

8. falcons helmet Vic Beasley, DE, Clemson

Falcons need a pass rusher, they have forever (since John Abraham drifted off into the sunset), they tried Osi Umenyiora last year, no dice. They grabbed Brooks Reed (more of a traditional 4-3 OLB) and Adrian Clayborn (mediocre and injured), but Dan Quinn is thankfully smart enough to know the problem isn’t solved.

Watch out for a possible trade for Michael Bennett by the former Seahawks defensive coordinator, but if everyone stays put, Beasley is the best player on the board and fits perfectly as a 4-3 defensive end. He brings the ideal size, supreme athleticism and an impressive array of skills as both a pass-rusher and run-defender. He is the most complete edge player in the draft outside of Dante Fowler, plus he said it would be a dream come true to play for the Falcons. Dreams really do come true.

vic

Look Ma, I’m an airplane

Height: 6’3

Weight: 246

2014 stats: 34 tackles, 21.5 tackles for loss, 12 sacks, 1 fumble return for touchdown, 2 forced fumbles

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: rotational pass rusher

Ceiling: Perennial Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Robert Mathis- Instinctive off the snap, possessing strong finesse pass rush skill set, smaller size for an edge player but possesses ability to set edge and push plays out wide.

9. giants helmet Ereck Flowers, OT, Miami

The Giants have their own one-trick pony pass rusher in JPP and Landon Collins and Bud Dupree don’t fit the range, they went out and grabbed a DT (Kenrick Ellis) in free agency and there’s no inside linebackers worthy of the top 20 picks in this year’s draft. Tom Coughlin is sticking around, which means Eli will still be the quarterback.

All of that in mind, it makes sense to challenge the left tackle spot with a house of a man like Ereck Flowers. Despite being so large, Flowers has swing tackle traits and surprisingly fluid feet. He’s a fast riser in both pass protection and as a mauler. He really is a prototype who could contribute from day 1 and make life easier for the entire Giants offense. As a bonus, he has the size and skills to slide inside and could supplant woeful incumbent guard John Jerry.

ereck flowers

On the goal line and out wide, Flowers really does fit anywhere

Height: 6’6

Weight: 329 lbs.

Projection: Strong starter

Floor: Swing tackle

Ceiling: All Pro

NFL Comparison: Tyron Smith (OT, Dallas Cowboys)- Possesses the quick feet and fluid hips despite the size. Athleticism is strong and a mean streak comes with it. Can road grade when asked but always ascending in pass protection.

10. rams helmet Amari Cooper, WR, Alabama

And all the Rams fans cheered. They finally found their number one receiver, and just in time to help new addition Nick Foles get acquainted with the Rams offense. While Kevin White might have a more ideal frame and more potential, Cooper has a polish and pro-readiness rarely seen from draft prospects. He also had over 1700 yards last year.

Cooper provides a target on all levels of the field, he can win deep, he’ll brave the middle and he can win with quickness on short routes. He’s a coaches’ darling as he is not a diva and actually has quite a reserved demeanor. Though he’s had some issues with drops, he’s a hard worker and NFL coaching will likely help correct that. He’ll be a mainstay in any NFL offense for the next decade.

amari-cooper

Coopering, from the guys who brought you Tebowing

Height: 6’1

Weight: 211 lbs.

2014 stats: 124 catches, 1727 yards, 16 touchdowns

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: High-end WR2

Ceiling: Perennial Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Isaac Bruce (WR, St. Louis Rams)- Can pop the top off a defense or take a short pass to the house, crisp route-runner, loyal, consistent, with strong body control and vision in the open field.