Scouting Report: Marshon Lattimore

By: Shae Dougall

Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State

6’0”, 193 lbs

Lattimore

Tape Viewed:

Ohio State vs Wisconsin (2016)

Ohio State vs Michigan (2016)

Ohio State vs Oklahoma (2016)

OVERVIEW

Marshon Lattimore is a beast of an athlete. His combine numbers were fantastic, and the tape backs those numbers up. He has ridiculous, natural coverage ability and makeup speed that could make any defensive backs coach swoon. His soft tissue injury history is concerning, but his raw talent and instinct are tantalizing beyond any team’s wildest dreams.

 

COVERAGE

Play Recognition: 10 out of 10

Appears to always know what is required of him on any given play, and I never once saw him out of position on any tape that I watched.

 

Speed: 4.5 out of 5

(4.36 40yd)

Excellent speed for a shorter corner, easily able to keep up with any college receiver. Should be able to use remarkable athletic ability to recover against the fastest NFL receivers to make up for any straight line speed deficiencies.

 

Mirroring: 10 out of 10

Can instantly recognize, process, and mirror any route thrown at him. Frequently runs routes better than some WRs, especially deep ones.

 

Pursuit: 5 out of 5

One of Lattimore’s best skills; can catch up to any play, and can consistently outspeed receivers to defense or intercept underthrown passes (and overthrown ones)!

 

Man: 14.5 out of 15

Per NFL.com, Lattimore was only challenged 35 times in the entire 2016 season (average of less than 3 times per game), and it didn’t work out well for those quarterbacks, as it resulted in 4 interceptions and a whopping 14 passes defensed. Man coverage is definitely Lattimore’s strength, as he’s able to use his mega-athleticism to keep his receiver locked down.

 

Zone: 12.5 out of 15

At his best, Lattimore might be able to play safety with how instinctive he usually is in zone coverage. At his worst, he sometimes freezes when the zone coverage around him breaks down. As I’ve said 100 times already, though, he can use his great talent and athleticism to make up for those rare moments of indecision.

 

Press: 4.5 out of 5

Very willing to get up into opposing WRs grills. Will lock them up at the line without hesitation. Doesn’t win every single time and can get burned as a result, but it’s a trait I like to see in corners, and Lattimore also has the hip speed to catch up to anyone but the fastest receivers in these situations.

 

Tackle: 4.5 out of 5

Great open field tackler (for a corner). Was able to catch up to and bring down running backs and tight ends running route patterns if the initial tackler whiffed.

 

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Willing to go up and get overthrown passes, sacrificing his body for a diving interception in the Oklahoma game that I watched. The pass was deemed incomplete, but it wasn’t a great call. Lattimore has soft hands that would impress any cornerback in the NFL.

 

RUN SUPPORT

Tackle: 4 out of 5

Able to bring guys down when needed, but I question if his “go low” approach will work every time, especially in the NFL.

 

Play Recognition: 5 out of 5

Coverage ceases immediately when the run play begins.

 

Willingness: 3 out of 5

 

As willing as the average NFL corner to get involved in a run play; I didn’t see any tape to suggest otherwise.

 

GENERAL

Injury: 3 out of 10

This is easily the biggest concern for Marshon Lattimore. Chronic hamstring problems sidelined him for the majority of the 2015 season. They got so bad that he even had to have surgery. Don’t expect Lattimore to have many career years where he plays a full season, especially not in the NFL which practices harder and more often, plays more games, and generally requires more from cornerbacks from a physical standpoint. I don’t think these concerns are enough to keep him out of the first round or anything, but it’s definitely something to watch out for.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 85.5 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Jason Verrett, CB, San Diego Chargers

OU OHIO STATE FOOTBALL

Jason Verrett, Jeremy Maclin

Verrett is perhaps the greatest coverage cornerback left in this league (a talent which I’ve endlessly touted Lattimore for above), and yet most people outside of the darkest inner regions of NFL fandom have no awareness of his existence or incredible work. This is because, like Lattimore, he cannot stay healthy for an entire season. With such a supreme and promising talent like Lattimore coming into the league, I think I speak for everyone when I say that I sincerely hope we see more of Lattimore than we have of Verrett up to this point in his career. Both Verrett and Lattimore share the ability to match up and truly shut down even the best competition, when they’re on the field, despite their relatively diminutive stature for the outside corner position.

A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Derrick Henry Scouting Report

Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama

6’3 238

Tape Viewed: 2014 vs. Michigan, 2015 vs. Ole Miss, 2015 vs. Georgia, 2015 vs. Wisconsin

Henry

A true volume runner, Henry runs with a purpose and has very solid pad level and gets more effective as the game goes on. This is especially shown in the Georgia game where the defense is clearly fired up to stop him and even forces a fumble early.

He seems to take it as a challenge and just becomes impossible to bring down with less than three men as the game goes on. He’s an adequate pass catcher but was a limited route runner in the Alabama offense.

He shows solid top-end speed coming downhill as a runner and excels as a one-cut specialist. When he gets up to speed, he’s difficult to bring down but he’s not sudden or quick from a flat start and doesn’t maintain speed laterally at an elite level.

He is a brilliant pass protector, and an adequate lead blocker. Benefited from excellent blocks on most of his long runs and could struggle without support at the next level.

RUSHING

Speed: 3 out of 5

Henry can get going downhill, shown on two long runs against Wisconsin, but it’s more dependent on the blocking to get him to the second level where safeties are usually already in the box to stop him. His top speed would be average in the NFL and slightly above-average burst.

Power: 4 out of 5

He runs angry, for sure. But has more finesse to his game than you’d expect for a man his size. Still, he can hit like a ton of bricks, this especially shows up later in games.

Field Vision: 11 out of 15

While he does a nice job working off blocks, rarely does his ability to read the field jump off of tape. The creases he runs through are fairly obvious and he doesn’t really use the width of the field, preferring straight-line running. This likely limits some of his gains.

Balance: 8 out of 10

While Henry can usually maintain his balance through arm tackles, he can get tripped up easily in the open field. He shows elite balance when bending around the edge.

Break Tackle: 7 out of 10

Henry needs to learn to use his size in this aspect, he should be able to break far more tackles than he does. It’s very good compared to most backs but he should not be brought down in the open-field or hammered at the line one-on-one and he was, at least a few times in the Georgia game.

Moves: 3 out of 5

Uses the juke and stiff arm well, had a half-spin that gained him some extra yards. None of his moves are terribly impressive and he mostly relies on burst and power to gain yards.

Run blocking: 3 out of 5

He’s an adequate lead blocker, but no blocks really stood out on tape as helping spring an offensive player.

RECEIVING

Route running: 3 out of 5

On tape, I saw Henry run 5 screens and a swing pass. He does a really nice job selling the block and whipping around on the screen. The swing was all right but he didn’t find the open space. Not much to see here. He should be adequate.

Hands: 8 out of 10

In 6 passes, he had one drop. The drop was more the result of a lack of concentration than anything else.

Run after catch: 3 out of 5

On the screens, he shows surprising wiggle to make defenders miss, there’s just not enough data to project much better.

Blocking: 2 out of 5

Looks lackadaisical at times and on a few plays would have been burned if the play had shifted back to his side, he takes plays off when he doesn’t expect the ball.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 5 out of 5

Henry gets solid pad level, squares up and pops with authority. He’s rarely out-leveraged and also has a really effective cut block.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

He never gives up sacks and rarely gives up pressure.

Potential: 10 out of 10

Has the frame and mean streak to be dominant in this aspect for as long as he plays in the pros.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 75/100

NFL Comparison: James Starks, RB, Packers

StarksHenry 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are really no perfect comparisons for Henry in the NFL. He’s an uncommon specimen at his size but he and Starks are long one-cut runners who have good burst and run with power. They use field vision to set up blocks in the short area and accelerate into the secondary. Both are adequate pass catchers and Starks has shown he’s a solid volume runner when he’s had opportunities to start over Eddie Lacy.

A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Ezekiel Elliott Scouting Report

Ezekiel Elliott, RB, Ohio State

6’0 225 lbs

Tape Viewed: 2014 vs. Michigan, 2014 vs. Wisconsin, 2015 vs. Virginia Tech, 2015 vs. Oregon

Elliott

Ohio State plays Indiana at Ohio Stadium on Saturday, November 22, 2014 in Columbus, Ohio.

OVERVIEW

Elliott possesses rare burst through the crease. He shoots through the line like a rocket into the secondary and can change direction laterally without losing speed. Benefited from running out of a spread, he’s an excellent run blocker that was used often in this capacity and also has the ability to receive out of the backfield.

What makes Elliott special is his mix of speed, field vision and balance, he uses these three traits to get to the secondary, and bust through arm tackles to finish for touchdowns more often than most.

Elliott has some strange lapses in concentration on tape, resulting in fumbles but they show up rarely and are likely the result of youth and slight inexperience. He is a very impressive prospect with a compact frame that could maybe stand to add a little bit of muscle weight in his legs.

Already a brilliant prospect in 2014, he upped nearly every facet of his game this past season and put an exclamation point on it by rushing for 149 yards and 4 touchdowns in the Fiesta Bowl against Notre Dame.

 

 

RUSHING

Speed: 5 out of 5

Elliott may not put up a blazing 40 time, but his burst is rare and he has the speed to run away from defensive backs, while never losing it when moving laterally.

 

Elliott Burst speed

Outrunning the highly talented and athletic Alabama defense is nothing to sniff at. Elliott really burst onto the national scene with this dominating performance on the big stage.

 

Power: 3 out of 5

He rarely lowers his shoulders for trucking moves, but he’s definitely a load to bring down and runs with a physical presence.

 

Field Vision: 14 out of 15

Perhaps the best aspect of Elliott’s game, he works off excellent blocking from his lineman but rarely fails to find the crease when it’s there. On his long touchdown runs, this ability really shows as he dances through lanes deep into the secondary, easily transitioning from lateral to vertical movement.

 

Elliott burst, field vision, elusiveness

Giv via SB Nation. Elliott shows his graceful dance through Oregon’s secondary for a long touchdown. He sets up the block by WR Michael Thomas (3) and uses burst to get through the crease.

 

Balance: 10 out of 10

Had some brilliant moments on tape, including maintaining balance to burst for 2 more yards and a touchdown against Michigan, he shows rare ability in this aspect.

Elliott balance

After being tripped up, Elliott regains his balance almost immediately to burst up-field, turning a loss into a gain.

 

Break Tackle: 7 out of 10

Rarely goes down on first contact, but can get blown up one-on-one.

 

Elliott Break Tackle

Gif via SB Nation. Busts right through the tackle to walk into the end-zone, despite the tackler squaring up and getting low.

 

Moves: 3 out of 5

Has a nice juke and hurdle but rarely, if ever, uses a spin or truck.

 

Run blocking: 5 out of 5

Really nice lead block to spring QB Cardale Jones for a TD against Oregon. He has very good awareness of how a play develops and uses that mixed with tenacity to be a force in the run game even without the ball.

 

RECEIVING

Route running: 4 out of 5

There isn’t a lot of data here, but he looks to be a fine route runner who could develop at the next level.

 

Hands: 8 out of 10

One drop on tape. As long as he’s focused, he’s reliable as a receiver out of the backfield.

 

Run after catch: 3 out of 5

A natural athlete in the open field, can make a play when there’s cushion, but lacks elite wiggle to get away when the defense is a little tighter.

 

Elliott hands

Elliott runs a nice little swing, creating the necessary cushion, completes the catch and gets up-field for the touchdown, bursting through a tackle and finishing forward.

 

Blocking: 4 out of 5

Much like his ability in the run game, when asked to block for receiver’s downfield, he’s willing and able. Came back from ten yards downfield to spring WR Braxton Miller for a touchdown against Virginia Tech

 

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 4 out of 5

Squares up well and has solid pad level but can get lazy with his feet causing him to lose balance when someone comes at him with a bull rush.

 

Effectiveness: 4 out of 5

Bowled over by current-Packers linebacker Jake Ryan, nearly gives up safety to Oregon DE Gus Cumberlander. Other than that, Elliot is very stout in pass protection, he did not give up a sack on tape.

 

Elliot pass blocking

Elliott helps pick up the rusher as he bursts by the blocking tight end on Jones’ blindside. It’s not always pretty, but Elliott gets the job done in pass protection.

 

Potential: 8 out of 10

Looks like this could be a strength to his game at the next level, I don’t think he’ll be elite but neither do I think he’ll ever be a detriment in this area.

 

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82/100

NFL Comparison: Le’Veon Bell, RB, Steelers

BellElliott 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No real weak points in their respective games. Elliott and Bell share incredible burst to pull away from defenders and the field vision to find those lanes and creases. Bell is a more accomplished pass catcher but Elliott has shown all the ability to develop in that role. Both are three-down backs that should never come off the field.

 

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