Scouting Report: Quincy Wilson

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Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida

6’1 211 lbs.

Wilson

Tape Viewed: 2016 vs. Alabama, 2016 vs. Florida State, 2016 vs. UMASS, 2016 vs. Missouri

 

OVERVIEW

 

Wilson has the look and attitude teams love to see in their cornerbacks. He’s a sturdy player with a tapered but well-proportioned body. For his size, he has impressive functional speed and athleticism while flashing seriously impressive ability in coverage.

He also happens to have enough confidence to fill an open-air stadium, which is clearly visible with his relaxed demeanor on the field. Wilson never panics, never seems to get rattled, and tends to use this ability to get in the head of his opponent. Wilson is an intimidator who likes to use his imposing size down the field to the catch point.

Wilson may never be the superstar he clearly believes he is, but he’s a solid cornerback prospect with a very high floor. As a safety, perhaps he could be a star, he has all the tools but needs to become a more reliable tackler.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 8 out of 10

He’s not elite in his quickness of diagnosing the offensive play, but he has some brilliant reads on tape that result in big plays for the defense.

 

Speed: 4 out of 5

This was a surprising aspect on film, for such a sturdy frame, Wilson is an impressively fluid athlete, showing impressive ability to stay with receivers downfield.

 

Mirroring: 9 out of 10

Another surprise based on his stature, Wilson has perhaps the most natural and technique-sound hip swivel of any prospect in this draft and it serves him very well on nearly every route. There are times where receivers shake him, but it’s not common.

 

Pursuit: 4 out of 5

This ability is very important with all the zone coverage he’s asked to do, Wilson closes as good as or better than most.

 

Man: 12 out of 15

Wilson has every physical attribute and technical skill needed to be a dominant man-corner, he just needs more experience on the island.

 

Zone: 14 out of 15

This is the area where Wilson’s most spectacular plays on tape happen, he flashes exceptional ability to effectively shut down multiple targets with his understanding of spacing and closing speed.

 

Press: 3 out of 5

While this aspect of his game doesn’t come up often, his physicality and imposing size would suggest that he has the ability to throttle refers at the line of scrimmage.

 

Tackle: 3 out of 5

While Wilson has an exceptional ability to get himself in proper position and shows strong form to drive through players, he must have greased up arms, because he flies every which way after bouncing off the player he’s attempting to tackle. This happens often enough to be a decent cause for concern.

 

Ball Skills: 3 out of 5

Only one interception on tape, and a few nice pass breakups, Wilson should be more involved with the ball than he is based on his coverage ability. Perhaps this is something that will develop with experience.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 2 out of 5

Even more egregious are his tackle attempts in the run game. Routinely, whether going high or low against Alabama running back Bo Scarbrough, Wilson looked like a rag doll. Though he kept sticking his nose in there and giving it another go despite Scarbrough’s frightening combination of size and speed.

 

Play Recognition: 3 out of 5

Wilson looks like an ascending player in this regard, showing a decent understanding of how run plays develop. There are a few too many times where he runs with the receiver down the field on delayed handoffs. However, he was among the first to diagnose an incredibly tricky designed run play against Alabama, promptly missing another attempt on Scarbrough in the process.

 

Willingness: 5 out of 5

As mentioned above, Wilson has a nose for the ball and an eagerness to get down and dirty that rivals any cornerback on the NFL level. He’s physical and he loves lining up and attempting to deliver tackles.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 10 out of 10

It doesn’t appear that Wilson missed a single game in college due to injury. There is no cause for concern in this aspect as a prospect.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 80 out of 100

Pro Comparison: Malcolm Jenkins, S, Philadelphia Eagles

Wilson 1

Jenkins

Jenkins was an outstanding prospect back in 2008, a finalist for the Bednarik award (NCAA’s Best Defensive Player) and a winner of the Jim Thorpe (Best Defensive Back) as a cornerback. He had the size, length and coverage skills teams covet in a number 1 corner. His stature, relative lack of elite speed and impressive understanding of NFL offenses all led him to become a pro-bowl safety, finally flourishing with the Philadelphia Eagles. Wilson shares so much of this makeup, that it’d be almost redundant to describe it. Simply put, Wilson will find success in the NFL, it just remains to be seen at which position.

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Scouting Report: Jalen “Teez” Tabor

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By: Shae Dougall

Jalen Tabor, CB, Florida

6’0”, 199lbs

Tabor

Tape Viewed:

Florida vs Alabama (2016)

Florida vs LSU (2016)

Florida vs Florida State (2016)

OVERVIEW

Teez Tabor can do a little bit of everything. He’s a very experienced, successful cornerback from Florida whose claim to fame is a rock-solid, consistent, high-quality presence in a very good group of DBs. Despite having fairly slow straight-line speed, he has that undefinable “quickness” quality that scouts love to talk about. Tabor was made to play more off-coverage, as he’s more of a finesse guy who would probably get beaten consistently downfield if he was forced to press big, fast receivers all the time.

 

Tabor is going to be a bit of a risk-taker in the NFL if his college tape is any indication. This will result in some picks, but will also result in some big plays going the other way. A team with a good group of safeties that play over the top would likely be the ideal fit for Tabor, because some of the craftier QBs will be able to take advantage of his gambling. Tabor is also not the biggest guy in the world, and much like Tre’Davious White, I’m concerned that his lack of size will result in him not only getting boxed out of quick routes, but also getting beat over the top. His vertical jump from the combine was only 31 inches, and he did struggle with deep speed at times in college.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 10 out of 10

The reason Tabor was so successful in college was due in large part to his ability to read the quarterback’s eyes and adjust to the receiver quickly. Since Tabor is not a once-in-a-lifetime type of athlete (not even close, really), he has clearly honed his play recognition skills to make up for these deficiencies. His read and react capability is off the charts, making a few plays where he actually left his assignment to follow a play that he knew was developing elsewhere on the field. This can also be viewed as a negative I suppose, but he seems to be instinctive and smart enough to understand when to take risks.

 

Speed: 3 out of 5

Tabor disappointed at the combine with a slow 4.6 40 time. Per NFL.com, there are also “whispers” that Tabor “fears deep speed”, which is evidenced by the amount of off coverage he played at Florida. I’m not that plugged in, unfortunately, but I did see several situations on tape where Tabor was pressing the receiver and backed off more than 8 yards before the play started. He has quick recovery time when the ball is in the air, but his penchant for getting beat over the top is concerning.

 

Mirroring: 10 out of 10

Even when pressing, Tabor’s mirroring ability is excellent. He sticks to receivers coming out of cuts like glue, consistently providing tight man-to-man coverage.

 

Pursuit: 4 out of 5

While Tabor isn’t going to catch up to any plays that are over his head, he has a very solid ability to chase down plays that develop on the other side of the field. More than once on tape (especially against LSU), I saw opposing quarterbacks scramble out of a collapsing pocket only to be chased down by Tabor once the line of scrimmage had been crossed.

 

Man: 12 out of 15

Tabor will be a good man coverage corner, as he is consistently able to read the play and mirror his receiver on shorter and intermediate routes. His deep coverage ability is a concern, though, especially with the precision deep passing of NFL quarterbacks. I’d also like to see Tabor get more physical at the line of scrimmage, but I don’t believe that his lack of physicality is unfixable or even necessarily undesirable. His desire to be physical at the line is probably affected by his knowledge of his own limitations on deep routes.

 

Zone: 14 out of 15

Tabor may be the best zone corner in this draft with his uncanny instincts and penchant for reading the quarterback’s eyes. Would be an ideal fit for a team that runs a lot of zone coverage. I expect some infrequent gambling-related breakdowns in zone coverage on trick plays and misdirection passing plays. Luckily, Tabor mostly knows when to hold ‘em, and when to fold ‘em.

 

Press: 3 out of 5

I don’t foresee an NFL future in which Tabor is playing much bump-and-run coverage. Tabor can press effectively on occasion, but Florida didn’t ask him to do much of it because it’s clearly not a strength of his.

 

Tackle: 3.5 out of 5

He’s not the best tackling cornerback out there, but he’s not the worst. Once the receiver is well-covered, he’s certainly not getting any yards after the catch. Open field tackles are more of a weakness though; Tabor was occasionally out of position to tackle on deep routes where the receiver wasn’t his responsibility but he was in the area.

 

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Tabor has great hands and the ability to affect the ball in the air. He’s also great at punching the ball out of the receiver’s outstretched hands, which I saw on more than one occasion. He finished his Florida career with 9 interceptions, an impressive number.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 3 out of 5

This is a difficult category to speak to because I rarely saw Tabor stick his nose into a pile of guys and bring the runner down. I’m pretty sure he can do it because he can bring down receivers pretty consistently, but without seeing him take on the toughest college backs (even when Florida played LSU, I don’t recall seeing Tabor vs. Fournette on any occasion), I think it’s hard to be 100% certain.

 

Play Recognition: 4 out of 5

I caught Tabor out of position on a trick run play against LSU, but that was a special circumstance. I can assume that he usually realizes when the run is developing, similarly to how he always seems to know where the pass is going to go.

 

Willingness: 2 out of 5

He is not an eager participant in run support, but he will get involved if it looks like the play is getting serious or if he is the last line of defense. Usually he gets swallowed up by a block and lets somebody else do the dirty work.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 8 out of 10

This template is a bit flawed in the sense that I’m allowed to talk about a prospect’s injury history but not his suspension history. Tabor was suspended in college a couple of times, and it’s always difficult to say how that will translate to the NFL. It’s definitely a concern. Even though injury isn’t an issue with Tabor, I would say that it’s reasonable to see him miss some time for other, less wholesome reasons.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 81.5 out of 100

Pro Comparison: Asante Samuel

Tabor 1

Samuel

Okay, this is too easy. I don’t even have to write a lot. What other NFL player in the past 15 years gambled more and tackled less than Asante Samuel? He was also a good guesser, resulting in a lot of interceptions. I maintain that Samuel could have extended his career into his mid-40s if he had just switched to a situational free safety that had a contract requirement that he wasn’t allowed to tackle anybody.

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Scouting Report: Tre’Davious White

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By: Shae Dougall

Tre’Davious White, CB, LSU

5’11”, 192 lbs

White

Tape Viewed:

LSU vs Florida (2016)

LSU vs Wisconsin (2016)

LSU vs Texas A&M (2016)

OVERVIEW

White is the kind of player who will likely fall in the draft due to poor size, measurables (a 4.47 40yd dash, only 32 inch vertical), and unremarkable if not unimpressive film. Tre’Davious White is a good outside cover corner, but when LSU used him in the slot, his lack of size and tendency to shy away from physicality displayed on tape could be a red flag (if I was a GM of a team that required tough cornerbacks, that is). I’ve seen White slotted as high as the early 2nd round, and I don’t know if that’s really realistic in a draft class of other strong cornerback prospects that do what White does just as well as him. Maybe the SEC bias will kick in?

COVERAGE

Play Recognition: 9 out of 10

I have no issue with White’s play recognition. It doesn’t take him very long at all to get into the proper position for covering longer routes.

 

Speed: 4 out of 5

He’s got pretty average speed for a corner, especially when it comes to making up time when beat on a quick slant or dig out of the slot. (Can you already tell I wouldn’t want White playing in the slot?) White does have the requisite (and undefinable) “quickness” that is required to be an NFL corner, however.

 

Mirroring: 8 out of 10

Of the tape I watched, his mirroring of outside routes was excellent because of his quick footwork, but he occasionally struggled with opening his hips during sharp receiver cuts while playing in the slot. His technique can also get a little sloppy when forced to get physical, whether in the slot or outside, although his instincts and impeccable footwork may make up for this a little bit.

 

Pursuit: 4 out of 5

Doesn’t seem to possess elite catch-up speed on hard cuts. Does seem to have the ability to make up lost ground on deeper routes, although I’m unsure about whether that will translate to the next level where the quarterbacks are much more accurate.

 

Man: 13.5 out of 15

White can play man very effectively against a large percentage of college receivers, guys who either don’t have the speed, footwork, agility, hands, or route running ability to make it in the NFL. The problems, as I believe I’ve mentioned in just about every blurb now, bubble to the surface when he’s asked to play in the slot, or cover quick routes. He’s too finesse for that position right now. Maybe he could cover Victor Cruz, but if Antonio Brown moves into the slot, look out. That ‘Killer B’ is going to have one heck of a fantasy day.

That’s just one negative in an otherwise solid 3 years of starting experience playing mostly man coverage, though. White’s specific strengths on the outside (and the slot, for what it’s worth) include covering post routes and crosses, and other types of intermediate routes that don’t allow the receiver to effectively box White out of the play. In fact, I would feel very comfortable allowing White to play slot if the other team made some type of promise that they were only going to call flag routes.

 

Zone: 11 out of 15

Similar to his man coverage ability, White can cover these receivers fairly well, and I think that his zone skills will continue to develop nicely if the drafting team’s coaching staff affords a deeper off-coverage zone scheme. White will likely excel if used in those types of situations, but he’s definitely in a little bit of a box if the physical nature of his game never develops.

 

Press: 2 out of 5

Of all the tape I watched on Tre’Davious White, I don’t recall ever seeing him put his hands on the receivers he was covering, even when he was in press coverage. This is something that will certainly delegate him to “project” status with a lot of NFL teams, and perhaps even “undraftable” status for others. He does have a quick first step however, and even if he refuses to touch the receivers, he can at least keep up with their explosiveness…unless he takes a stiff arm in the chin.

 

Tackle: 3.5 out of 5

Despite the lack of physicality that I’ve lamented a billion times on this writeup, White can tackle a little bit. He’s not anything more than average in this category, but tackling is a lower priority for cornerbacks than just about any other defensive position, so it would be unfair for me to punish him too much for this.

 

Ball Skills: 3 out of 5

I don’t see White as having an incredible career where he averages 5 interceptions a year, because his hands simply aren’t very good. He can play the ball decently to collect some “passes defensed” stats, but I can also see the NFL’s current crop of behemoth receivers going over the top of him to snatch touchdowns on hitch and fade routes.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 3 out of 5

White can probably tackle running backs if he wants to, but he’s not often asked to run blitz or get too involved. And why should he be? How is a 190 pound, sub-six-foot corner going to bring down Fat Eddie or Shady McCoy on his own? Is the message getting across yet? I AM NOT COMFORTABLE WITH TRE’DAVIOUS WHITE’S LEVEL OF PHYSICALITY.

 

Play Recognition: 4 out of 5

I noticed a couple of plays watching film where White didn’t appear to be all too concerned with the running play, although he was usually able to get around a block or two and eventually end up near the ball by the end of the play.

 

Willingness: 2.5 out of 5

The question I have to answer to write this blurb is simple: Does the defensive back seem to be willing to get involved in tackling the runner? My answer is even simpler: Not particularly.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 9 out of 10

Rarely missed time due to injury in college, but one would speculate that his rather slight frame could possibly result in some unforeseen time off. It’s unfair to dock White too much based on expectation, though, so I won’t.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 76.5/100

 

Pro Comparison: Ellis Hobbs, CB, Philadelphia Eagles/New England Patriots

White 1

Hobbs

This makes me sad as a former Eagles fan (read: current Eagles fan). Ellis Hobbs was a too-small corner who was often forced into the slot. He could cover some receivers more than competently, but he was often steamrolled by huge receivers, including a 2010 performance against the Titans where he was abused by none other than Kenny Britt (also known as my least favorite player of all time). A couple weeks later, he got a horrible back injury and was never heard from again, but I hope that doesn’t happen to White, who seems like a nice guy off the field and apparently has great leadership qualities. That being said, both White and Hobbs are very small. It was a problem in 2010, and it’s a problem in 2017.

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A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Will Fuller Scouting Report

Will Fuller, WR, Notre Dame

6’0 186 lbs.

Fuller

OVERVIEW:

Fuller is more polished and versatile than he gets credit for. Considered by fans and media to be a deep-ball specialist, he actually runs hitches, comebacks, ins and crosses as well. His route running is crisp and quick and his hands are consistent on tape, though he will have a focus-drop now and then.

Still, he’s at his best using his blazing speed and superior athleticism streaking by nearly every college defender unfortunate enough to draw him in coverage. That speed will translate to the NFL and he will be able to make game-breaking plays downfield.

The big problem with Fuller is his small stature, he could get bullied by more physical corners, like Clemson defensive back Mackenzie Alexander was able to do this year when they played. However, Fuller uses his deep speed to force defenders to give him cushion on underneath routes, and he’s willing and able to take a hit to come up with a tough catch.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN:

Hands: 16 out of 20

Fuller has a slight problem with focus drops, but is a solid hands catcher with a wide radius. He also has the ability to make tough catches away from his body.

Route Running: 17 out of 20

Fuller uses his deep speed and crisp cuts to create separation, he just needs to further develop his route tree at the next level.

Blocking: 12 out of 15

Fuller rarely misses a block but doesn’t often show the tenacity or aggressiveness of the better blocking prospects in this draft.

Athleticism: 14 out of 15

He’s definitely the fastest player in this draft with pads on. He also has burst to reach top speed quickly, and leaping ability to finish downfield.

Run after catch: 13 out of 15

Consistently finding extra yards after contact, Fuller has wiggle and speed but not the power or size to frequently finish forward through contact, which holds him back in this regard.

Size: 3 out of 10

Fuller is far too skinny for his own good and must add a little bulk, especially to his legs, to avoid severe injuries in the NFL.

Body Control: 4 out of 5

Able to contort his body on misplaced balls, he’s impressive in this capacity.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 79 out of 100

NFL Player Comparison: Mike Wallace, WR, Vikings

WallaceFuller 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A limited, but effective route-runner, wins with jaw-dropping straight-line speed and impressive short area burst. Both are game-changing threats downfield that are also dangerous on screens and over the middle. Fuller, however, is not a jack ass.

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A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers, Josh Doctson Scouting Report

Josh Doctson, WR, TCU

6’3 195 lbs.

Doctson

Watching his tape is an absolute pleasure. During this season, you’ll hear a lot of teams talking about finding guys that check off all the boxes and Doctson is absolutely one of those guys.

Just as impressive downfield as he is as a possession receiver over the middle, Doctson has the ability to chameleon into any role and be a meaningful contributor immediately at the next level. He can climb the ladder, plays the ball at its highest point beautifully, runs crafty routes and can out-physical just about any defensive back.

As if that weren’t enough, he’s also one of the best blockers I’ve ever evaluated. He sprung four touchdowns with his blocks on the tape I saw. He’s constantly hustling back to the play to contribute and clearly has a team-first mentality.

The only slight knock I have on him is he needs to gain more yards after the catch consistently. He doesn’t quite have the world class speed or freakish size either. But he will be a brilliant pro, no doubt. And the team that drafts him will have found a WR2 for the ages.

Hands: 18 out of 20

Doctson rarely drops a ball, and when he does, it’s usually while he’s several feet in the air or contorting his body in some way. He must work on being a more consistent hands-catcher as he lets some reach into his body.

Route Running: 16 out of 20

He doesn’t have the razor-sharp cuts of the great route runners, but makes up for it with a strong understanding of how to play his assignments like a fiddle. Still, better cutting would make creating separation easier.

Blocking: 15 out of 15

Simply spectacular in this regard. Doctson’s technique, effort and all-around effectiveness as a blocker make him stand out constantly on film.

Athleticism: 14 out of 15

He might have the best vertical in the class, he generates a ton of force from his legs. He’ll probably also run a solid 40, shows above-average acceleration and burst to go with average NFL speed.

Run after catch: 11 out of 15

The one part of his game he really needs to improve as a pro, Doctson is too content to fall forward for a couple of extra yards rather than maintain balance and fight for more.

Size: 7 out of 10

He’s clearly not fully grown into his frame, could use more weight in the midsection as he is extremely tapered.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

Shows ridiculous ability to contort himself, leap for high balls and maintain composure through contact.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 86 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Michael Floyd, WR, Arizona Cardinals

FloydDoctson 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possessing similar frames, both dominate at the point of the catch, using savvy route-running and impressive athleticism to high-point the ball on deep throws. Both also possess the toughness and willingness to run a full route tree, including routes over the middle. As a bonus, both are standout blockers as well.

A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers: Laquon Treadwell Scouting Report

Laquon Treadwell, WR, Ole Miss

6’2 210 lbs.

Treadwell

OVERVIEW

The single greatest weapon Treadwell has in his arsenal is his ability to win 50-50 balls. He not only does this effectively and consistently, he often makes the extreme look routine and mundane. He can also high point the ball better than most college corners.

While he is not a spectacular athlete by the NFL’s lofty standards, he should test well at the combine. He carries his pads and frame impressively, allowing abnormal body control when going up for contested catches.

Treadwell is a somewhat lazy route runner, not making precise cuts. This stymies his ability to create separation. He also struggles with proper form in blocking, though he is incredibly aggressive and willing in that area of his game.

The biggest thing he can do at the next level to improve is to study: his awareness of defensive concepts is clearly lacking as he can constantly be seen taking himself out of the play in zone coverages, rather than sitting in the soft spots. He’s an absolute mismatch for most corners in man coverage though and demands extra defensive attention constantly.

He has the demeanor and confidence required of a number one receiver to go along with solid size.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN

Hands: 17 out of 20

While Treadwell made some ridiculous catches on tape, and only had one true drop, he missed on some difficult but catchable balls. One that really stood out was a slightly overthrown deep ball late in a 2015 blowout by Florida.

Route Running: 12 out of 20

He must improve this facet of his game to be a truly elite prospect. He doesn’t often look like he cares to try to create separation and will be feasted on by the NFL’s feistier corners for this.

Blocking: 13 out of 15

He’s brilliantly effective as a blocker downfield, though he lacks the short area quickness to handle blocking when the corner is in press coverage. He’s extremely aggressive and will often block right through the whistle. He has a good understanding of when to disengage and switch his man as well.

Athleticism: 13 out of 15

He’s a phenomenal athlete when all factors are taken into account. He can do pretty much anything asked of him on a football field, outrun or jump over defenses and even has the ability to rush and throw when called upon. He just won’t put up numbers that dazzle at the combine.

Run after catch: 14 out of 15

He has both the elusiveness and power to be an absolute nightmare in the open field. While he doesn’t often convert short throws to touchdowns, he’s almost never taken down for no gain after the catch and that speaks volumes to his ability.

Size: 8 out of 10

His frame is strong and compact, but in an era of big, tall receivers, he’s not quite the physical freak teams covet.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

His ability to twist and contort himself to make a catch pops on tape constantly.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Allen Robinson, WR, Jaguars

RobinsonTreadwell 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The breakout star for the Jags represents the pinnacle of Treadwell’s potential. Both are strong athletes with great hands who need improvement in route running and rely on muscle and ability to battle defensive backs.

 

ATTENTION READERS: The conversation doesn’t have to end after the report has been read. Like my thoughts? Take a moment to like my page. We’re on Facebook and Twitter, links below. Think I’m an idiot? Rail on me in the comments. I’m just starting out so any feedback at all is so greatly appreciated.

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