Scouting Report: Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma

Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma

NCAA Football: College Football Playoff Semifinal-Orange Bowl-Alabama vs Oklahoma

Height: 5’10 Weight: 207 lbs.

Tape Viewed: 2018 vs. Texas, 2018 vs. UCLA, 2018 vs. West Virginia, 2018 vs. Alabama (Orange Bowl)

 

OVERVIEW

Murray is a unique prospect, in that his stature is so striking, even at the college level. One could imagine once Murray takes an NFL huddle, the difference will be all the more accentuated. Trailblazers like Drew Brees, Russel Wilson and Doug Flutie have shown the workaround for extremely gifted QBs who are height-challenged. The key is finding passing lanes, and working the protection in the pocket. Another option is to be highly mobile, able to escape the pocket entirely and improvise as plays break down, count Murray in the number of the latter.

With his stark quickness, long speed, ability to navigate blocks, and willingness to take off as soon as he sees lanes forming, Murray is a running quarterback, first and foremost. He thrives most working outside the framework of a traditional NFL offense, much like Aaron Rodgers and Patrick Mahomes. The game is evolving in such a way that players like Murray not only are viable options, they’re becoming the new ideal. His arm talent, too, is impressive, but his scattershot accuracy brings questions about his ability to consistently keep his completion percentage in the high 60’s. Regardless, his big play potential and clear intelligence and patience will make him a player that has a high chance of early success.

 

PASSING

Accuracy: 10 out of 15

The actual mechanics of Murray’s game display his lack of experience. His footwork constantly affects his accuracy, even on passes he completes. He flashes incredible accuracy, especially deep downfield, but can miss simple throws because of his happy feet and lack of a tight release.

 

Power: 3 out of 5

Flashes functional throw power for most throws that will be asked of him, but will never be considered as having a rocket arm. Struggles driving balls to the sideline from the opposite hash.

 

On the run: 3 out of 5

This is where Murray’s best and worst plays tend to occur. Especially on one deep TD against Alabama, Murray throws an absolute dime in a full forward sprint. However, Murray also puts balls behind, too high, and too low, often on film. Most of those throws are when he’s scrambling.

 

Consistency: 8 out of 10

Murray typically plays at an extremely high level for a college player, displaying an excellent understanding of situational football. There are occasional bizarre lapses, where all fundamentals go out the window and he can look fully out of rhythm.

 

Field General: 16 out of 20

Murray does a great job operating his offense, moving around receivers and making strong reads presnap. He struggles with reaching intermediate reads, though he often didn’t need to at school. The system typically had him throwing to his first or second read, and they were usually open. There are occasional flashes of ability to run quickly though 3 or more reads, but it’s rare.

 

Athleticism: 5 out of 5

This is where Murray really shines, he displays incredible acceleration, and sufficient top speed to run away from top-level college defenses. His ability to work outside the script makes him a dangerous threat on every play.

 

Pocket awareness: 9 out of 10

While Murray does an excellent job using his pocket, and moving around it, he doesn’t often step up. This hasn’t gotten him into much trouble yet, but bares watching going forward.

 

Poise: 10 out of 10

Murray’s best comes out in big games, as the game against Bama displays, he showed heightened ability even from his incredible standards.

 

Clutch: 5 out of 5

Murray is definitely a late-game QB, he has a knack for rallies, as well as closing out close, hard-fought victories, with intelligent decision making.

 

Size: 2 out of 5

Clearly lacking ideal size, Murray’s slight frame could become an injury concern and will give many teams pause.

 

Reliability: 8 out of 10

 

Murray has had no injury issues, It’s a small sample size, but he’s been available consistently. However, there has been differing word on his interviewing ability and recall at the whiteboard. To me, this is a minor red-flag, because this could very well be a smokescreen.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 79/100

 

Pro Comparison: Doug Flutie, QB, Retired

Murray 1

Doug-flutie

Flutie was a diminutive quarterback that took his height limitations and crafted an incredibly unique and explosive game around his strengths. Both Flutie and Murray are outstanding natural runners, though with the nature of the game as it is today, Murray should expect far more career rushing yardage than Flutie’s 1634. Just as Flutie was a sensation and sparkplug for any team he suited up for, Murray definitely has that star quality needed to be a top-level NFL QB.

 

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Scouting Report: Marshon Lattimore

By: Shae Dougall

Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State

6’0”, 193 lbs

Lattimore

Tape Viewed:

Ohio State vs Wisconsin (2016)

Ohio State vs Michigan (2016)

Ohio State vs Oklahoma (2016)

OVERVIEW

Marshon Lattimore is a beast of an athlete. His combine numbers were fantastic, and the tape backs those numbers up. He has ridiculous, natural coverage ability and makeup speed that could make any defensive backs coach swoon. His soft tissue injury history is concerning, but his raw talent and instinct are tantalizing beyond any team’s wildest dreams.

 

COVERAGE

Play Recognition: 10 out of 10

Appears to always know what is required of him on any given play, and I never once saw him out of position on any tape that I watched.

 

Speed: 4.5 out of 5

(4.36 40yd)

Excellent speed for a shorter corner, easily able to keep up with any college receiver. Should be able to use remarkable athletic ability to recover against the fastest NFL receivers to make up for any straight line speed deficiencies.

 

Mirroring: 10 out of 10

Can instantly recognize, process, and mirror any route thrown at him. Frequently runs routes better than some WRs, especially deep ones.

 

Pursuit: 5 out of 5

One of Lattimore’s best skills; can catch up to any play, and can consistently outspeed receivers to defense or intercept underthrown passes (and overthrown ones)!

 

Man: 14.5 out of 15

Per NFL.com, Lattimore was only challenged 35 times in the entire 2016 season (average of less than 3 times per game), and it didn’t work out well for those quarterbacks, as it resulted in 4 interceptions and a whopping 14 passes defensed. Man coverage is definitely Lattimore’s strength, as he’s able to use his mega-athleticism to keep his receiver locked down.

 

Zone: 12.5 out of 15

At his best, Lattimore might be able to play safety with how instinctive he usually is in zone coverage. At his worst, he sometimes freezes when the zone coverage around him breaks down. As I’ve said 100 times already, though, he can use his great talent and athleticism to make up for those rare moments of indecision.

 

Press: 4.5 out of 5

Very willing to get up into opposing WRs grills. Will lock them up at the line without hesitation. Doesn’t win every single time and can get burned as a result, but it’s a trait I like to see in corners, and Lattimore also has the hip speed to catch up to anyone but the fastest receivers in these situations.

 

Tackle: 4.5 out of 5

Great open field tackler (for a corner). Was able to catch up to and bring down running backs and tight ends running route patterns if the initial tackler whiffed.

 

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Willing to go up and get overthrown passes, sacrificing his body for a diving interception in the Oklahoma game that I watched. The pass was deemed incomplete, but it wasn’t a great call. Lattimore has soft hands that would impress any cornerback in the NFL.

 

RUN SUPPORT

Tackle: 4 out of 5

Able to bring guys down when needed, but I question if his “go low” approach will work every time, especially in the NFL.

 

Play Recognition: 5 out of 5

Coverage ceases immediately when the run play begins.

 

Willingness: 3 out of 5

 

As willing as the average NFL corner to get involved in a run play; I didn’t see any tape to suggest otherwise.

 

GENERAL

Injury: 3 out of 10

This is easily the biggest concern for Marshon Lattimore. Chronic hamstring problems sidelined him for the majority of the 2015 season. They got so bad that he even had to have surgery. Don’t expect Lattimore to have many career years where he plays a full season, especially not in the NFL which practices harder and more often, plays more games, and generally requires more from cornerbacks from a physical standpoint. I don’t think these concerns are enough to keep him out of the first round or anything, but it’s definitely something to watch out for.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 85.5 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Jason Verrett, CB, San Diego Chargers

OU OHIO STATE FOOTBALL

Jason Verrett, Jeremy Maclin

Verrett is perhaps the greatest coverage cornerback left in this league (a talent which I’ve endlessly touted Lattimore for above), and yet most people outside of the darkest inner regions of NFL fandom have no awareness of his existence or incredible work. This is because, like Lattimore, he cannot stay healthy for an entire season. With such a supreme and promising talent like Lattimore coming into the league, I think I speak for everyone when I say that I sincerely hope we see more of Lattimore than we have of Verrett up to this point in his career. Both Verrett and Lattimore share the ability to match up and truly shut down even the best competition, when they’re on the field, despite their relatively diminutive stature for the outside corner position.

Saints 7-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo

Saints logo
12: R1P12: SHELDON RANKINS, DT, LOUISVILLE
6’1 299 lbs.
Louisville Football v Memphis
FIT: Last year, the Saints tried running a 4-3 base defense with Kevin Williams and John Jenkins at starter. While there were times Williams played well, watching Jenkins play was often about as pleasant as I imagine a brain aneurysm to be. The main problem at this position, there is not enough talent. Rankins might be the best in an absolutely loaded class, having turned many senior tackles into human turnstiles at Senior Bowl practices.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1998998/sheldon-rankins
47: R2P16: SHILIQUE CALHOUN, DE, MICHIGAN STATE
6’4 251 lbs.
NCAA Football: Rose Bowl-Stanford vs Michigan State

Jan 1, 2014; Pasadena, CA, USA; Michigan State Spartans defensive end Shilique Calhoun (89) tackles Stanford Cardinal running back Tyler Gaffney (25) during the second half at the Rose Bowl. Mandatory Credit: Richard Mackson-USA TODAY Sports

FIT: Akiem Hicks was so inept for the Saints defense, he was ousted by what could perhaps have been the worst starting 4-3 end in the league: Bobby Richardson. That may be a little harsh, but nobody’s claiming Richardson’s a starter. The Saints must find an answer opposite Cam Jordan and they may not have the cap space to find a starter in free agency. This class is solid at this position at the top, with zero depth.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1868388/shilique-calhoun
78: R3P15: DEION JONES, OLB, LSU
6’1 222 lbs.
Jones
FIT: Watching the Saints attempt to cover a tight end will either make you do a spit-take or cause indigestion, depending on your allegiance. Point being, they can cover a tight end like an umbrella with a hole in it can cover a person in the rain. This was especially prominent in the Tennessee game when the Saints allowed Craig Stevens and Anthony Fasano to combine for 5 catches, 58 yards and a game-winning touchdown in overtime. Jones possesses sideline-to-sideline coverage ability and would inject athleticism and speed into a defense that’s seemingly allergic to the concept.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1984265/deion-jones
113: R4P14: STERLING SHEPARD, WR, OKLAHOMA
5’10 194 lbs.
 Shepard
FIT: Marques Colston is out, and supposedly, Brandon Coleman is the answer. While the big, tall and athletic Coleman looked good in spot duty last year, the Saints need to think about injecting more talent into the receiving corps. I begged the Saints to grab Tyler Lockett last year, now with Shepard falling due to his size and a perceived weakness overall at the position, the Saints would be wise to grab the smooth, polished OU product if he’s available.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1996786/sterling-shepard
152: R5P13: REES ODHIAMBO, G, BOISE STATE
6’4 314 lbs.
 Odiambho
FIT: The Saints just cut ties with long-time starter Jahri Evans, and after jettisoning Ben Grubbs last season, there is very little talent at the position in the building. Depending on what they do in free agency, Sean Payton still counts this as one of the team’s biggest needs. Odhiambo is a talented prospect from outside the Power 5 who could be a steal in the fifth, might remind some fans of a certain Bloomsburg prospect.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1825221/rees-odhiambo
235: R7P16: ANTWAUN WOODS, DT, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
6’0 318 lbs.
Christian Powell, Antwaun Woods, Hayes Pullard

Colorado tailback Christian Powell, center, is tackled for a loss by Southern California linebacker Hayes Pullard, left, and defensive tackle Antwaun Woods (99) in the first quarter of an NCAA college football game in Boulder, Colo., Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) ** Usable by LA and DC Only **

FIT: Remember what I said about the Saints situation at defensive tackle? It’s that bad. With the draft so deep at defensive tackle, it makes sense to grab one at this late stage as well, and Woods has a workable frame to go with a high-motor and excellent work ethic. He’ll fit right in with the locker room Payton wants to build and might even find some playing time in a rotational role.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1851134/antwaun-woods

Mock Draft 3.0

Mock Draft 3.0

This post also appears in NFL Draft

  1. Bucs: Jameis Winston, QB, Florida State

This one is written in stone at this point, people will yawn when this one’s announced at the podium.

ACC Championship - Duke v Florida State

  1. Titans: Marcus Mariota, QB, Oregon

After much ado, the Titans cave and take a quarterback that could add a big spark to their franchise.

marcus-mariota-7

  1. TRADE Falcons: Dante Fowler Jr., OLB, Florida (Jaguars receive Falcons 1st, 2nd, 4th 2016 3rd)

Falcons jump up to grab the best overall outside backer in the draft to add some much-needed juice to their pass rush. How bad do they need it? The Falcons often couldn’t get to the passer before I would finish running a forty on a given play.

Fowler2

  1. Raiders: Amari Cooper, WR, Alabama

Kevin White may be the guy here but it’s looking more and more like the Raiders will be content with the pro-ready ultra-safe Alabama product. Unless Al Davis’ ghost shows up, then it’s White all the way.

amari-cooper

  1. TRADE Browns: Kevin White, WR, West Virginia (Redskins Receive Browns 1st, 2nd, 4th, 2016 2nd)

There have been talks heating up recently about the Browns jumping up and the Skins moving down. The Browns need a wide receiver like Floyd Mayweather needs a muzzle.

white

  1. TRADE Saints: Leonard Williams, DE/DT, USC (Jets receive Saints 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 2016 2nd, Saints receive Jets 4th)

Jets see more value in an extra second rounder here and the Saints jump up to grab a defensive difference maker. Williams will immediately provide some intrigue to a defensive line as stale as day-old popcorn.

leonard williams

  1. Bears: Danny Shelton, NT, Washington

Bears and Shelton are practically married in my mocks. It’s a match made in heaven too, I hope for nothing but their happily ever after.

shelton

  1. Jaguars: Todd Gurley, RB, Georgia

Jags want Gurley but they also want him at the right price, believe it or not David Caldwell nails this transaction and gets the guy he wanted most anyway, the extra second rounder will help with the pass rush need.

Tennessee v Georgia

  1. Giants: Brandon Scherff, OT/OG, Iowa

Could see pass rusher here but you’ve got to think the Giants see their rivals in Dallas building the league’s best o-line. It’s a copycat league, always has been.

scherff

  1. Rams: Trae Waynes, CB, Michigan State

Rams grab the starting corner Janoris Jenkins wishes he could be. Waynes and Jenkins will be an absolute nightmare for the soft NFC West receivers.

waynes

  1. Vikings: DeVante Parker, WR, Louisville

Parker and Bridgewater reunited, it even feels good for me and I could care less about the Vikings. Should help both parties, young quarterbacks thrive with familiarity, helps lessen the learning curve.

DeVante-Parker

  1. Redskins: Bud Dupree, OLB, Kentucky

Skins have to replace Orakpo. Even with Orakpo they had to blitz every play to barely eke out a Monday Night Football victory over the Cowboys. That’s not a recipe for success and Dupree has the potential to blossom into an even better player than Orakpo.

bud dupree

  1. Jets: Breshad Perriman, WR, Maryland

Jets grab a receiver to help their new starter, it makes a ton of sense for a team that had an abysmal offense last season and already has plenty of building blocks on defense. Perriman has the size and speed to develop into a dynamic target for Hundley/Petty/Grayson/Mannion… or whoever.

perriman

  1. Dolphins: La’el Collins, OT/OG, LSU

Collins’ recent questioning in a murder case is non-malicious, he’s not a suspect. The fact remains that Collins is one of the best offensive lineman in the draft and the Dolphins o-line has more leaks than icloud.

collins

  1. 49ers: Arik Armstead, DE/DT, Oregon

Another one that just seems written in stone at this point. I guess the 49ers have to replace Justin Smith, seems like Baalke to ignore every other pressing need (ILB, CB, OL, WR1, TE).

arik

  1. Texans: Kevin Johnson, CB, Wake Forest

Texans just locked up Kareem Jackson and Jonathan Joseph is a mainstay but corner seems like the hot pick here despite needs elsewhere. No receiver really fits the range with the injury to Strong.

kevin johnson

  1. Chargers: Melvin Gordon, RB, Wisconsin

I’m finally buying the Chargers taking a running back, Melvin Gordon would be an excellent fit for them, Oliver could catch the passes and Gordon can just focus on doing what he does best, wrecking opposing defenses in the open field.

Melvin Gordon

  1. Chiefs: Dorial Green-Beckham, WR, Oklahoma

Chiefs grab a receiver capable of catching a touchdown pass with another receiver they got in free agency also capable of doing that. Set for years at the position if Green-Beckham can keep his head on straight.

green-beckham

  1. Browns: Ereck Flowers, OT, Miami

GM Ray Farmer and Mike Pettine grab their second of two huge needs and protect whoever’s trying to throw to Kevin White in what’s sure to be another laughably mediocre Browns offense.

ereck

  1. Eagles: Landon Collins, S, Alabama

Eagles brass has said they don’t see Collins as a first rounder, I’m calling their bluff, which may be to play mind games with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Collins fills a need effectively, recent reports suggest some see him as even more versatile than expected.

landon collins

  1. Bengals: Randy Gregory, OLB, Nebraska

Gregory needs to be in a no-nonsense locker room where he will be humbled and grow up a little. Bengals need pass rush help. Perfect fit.

Gregory

  1. Steelers: Vic Beasley, DE, Clemson

Polamalu retired, Ike Taylor retired, Jason Worilds retired. One of these answers will be answered here in the first round.

vic beasley

  1. Lions: Andrus Peat, OT, Stanford

Peat has top-5 potential with feet on par with Jake Matthews last year. He’s got to get tougher at the point of attack, just like the Lions have to get Matt Stafford five extra seconds to heave to Calvin Johnson, Eric Ebron and Golden Tate every play.

Andrus Peat

  1. Cardinals: Shane Ray, OLB, Missouri

Cardinals dream scenario here. They are a team unafraid of off-field issues as Arians is a confident disciplinarian. Ray has the sort of motor they covet and they need to get younger in the linebacking corps.

shane ray

  1. Panthers: TJ Clemmings, OT, Pittsburgh

Panthers don’t manage to overthink themselves and finally give Cam Newton the athletic, strong bookend he needs.

clemmings

  1. Ravens: Malcom Brown, DE/DT, Texas

Ravens need a Ngata replacement, Brown is a top-15 talent that only tumbled based on need. They sprint to the podium for this one.

rbb texas vs iowa 03

  1. Cowboys: Shaq Thompson, OLB/S, Washington

Cowboys need insurance at linebacker and safety. Church might not be up to par as a starting safety and Sean Lee will go out for the season sometime between the first coin toss and the first snap. Thompson is the kind of athlete that will glue Rod Marinelli’s defense.

shaq

  1. Broncos: Cameron Erving, G/C, Florida State

Orlando Franklin flew the coop, Manning needs a clean pocket, especially as his arm strength dwindles.

erving

  1. Colts: Damarious Randall, S, Arizona State

The Colts safety situation is underrated in how poor it is. Randall is considered the best cover safety in the draft and one of the best ball hawks. Slight interest for a dull as dirt defense.

randall

  1. Packers: Denzel Perryman, ILB, Miami

Packers covet inside linebackers that can excel in the run-game at the point of attack, Perryman eats running backs for breakfast.

denzel-perryman-louisville1

  1. Saints: Eric Kendricks, ILB, UCLA

Curtis Lofton is gone, Ellerbe and Hawthorne are starting. Red alert. Saints grab a rangy linebacker with athleticism, motor and excellent character.

Kendricks

  1. Patriots: Jalen Strong, WR, Arizona State

Patriots grab a steal here, Strong would be the best receiver in seven of the last ten NFL drafts.

ASU+jaelen+strong3