A Prospect A Day: Wide Receivers: Laquon Treadwell Scouting Report

Laquon Treadwell, WR, Ole Miss

6’2 210 lbs.

Treadwell

OVERVIEW

The single greatest weapon Treadwell has in his arsenal is his ability to win 50-50 balls. He not only does this effectively and consistently, he often makes the extreme look routine and mundane. He can also high point the ball better than most college corners.

While he is not a spectacular athlete by the NFL’s lofty standards, he should test well at the combine. He carries his pads and frame impressively, allowing abnormal body control when going up for contested catches.

Treadwell is a somewhat lazy route runner, not making precise cuts. This stymies his ability to create separation. He also struggles with proper form in blocking, though he is incredibly aggressive and willing in that area of his game.

The biggest thing he can do at the next level to improve is to study: his awareness of defensive concepts is clearly lacking as he can constantly be seen taking himself out of the play in zone coverages, rather than sitting in the soft spots. He’s an absolute mismatch for most corners in man coverage though and demands extra defensive attention constantly.

He has the demeanor and confidence required of a number one receiver to go along with solid size.

RECEIVER BREAKDOWN

Hands: 17 out of 20

While Treadwell made some ridiculous catches on tape, and only had one true drop, he missed on some difficult but catchable balls. One that really stood out was a slightly overthrown deep ball late in a 2015 blowout by Florida.

Route Running: 12 out of 20

He must improve this facet of his game to be a truly elite prospect. He doesn’t often look like he cares to try to create separation and will be feasted on by the NFL’s feistier corners for this.

Blocking: 13 out of 15

He’s brilliantly effective as a blocker downfield, though he lacks the short area quickness to handle blocking when the corner is in press coverage. He’s extremely aggressive and will often block right through the whistle. He has a good understanding of when to disengage and switch his man as well.

Athleticism: 13 out of 15

He’s a phenomenal athlete when all factors are taken into account. He can do pretty much anything asked of him on a football field, outrun or jump over defenses and even has the ability to rush and throw when called upon. He just won’t put up numbers that dazzle at the combine.

Run after catch: 14 out of 15

He has both the elusiveness and power to be an absolute nightmare in the open field. While he doesn’t often convert short throws to touchdowns, he’s almost never taken down for no gain after the catch and that speaks volumes to his ability.

Size: 8 out of 10

His frame is strong and compact, but in an era of big, tall receivers, he’s not quite the physical freak teams covet.

Body Control: 5 out of 5

His ability to twist and contort himself to make a catch pops on tape constantly.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82 out of 100

NFL Comparison: Allen Robinson, WR, Jaguars

RobinsonTreadwell 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The breakout star for the Jags represents the pinnacle of Treadwell’s potential. Both are strong athletes with great hands who need improvement in route running and rely on muscle and ability to battle defensive backs.

 

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A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Derrick Henry Scouting Report

Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama

6’3 238

Tape Viewed: 2014 vs. Michigan, 2015 vs. Ole Miss, 2015 vs. Georgia, 2015 vs. Wisconsin

Henry

A true volume runner, Henry runs with a purpose and has very solid pad level and gets more effective as the game goes on. This is especially shown in the Georgia game where the defense is clearly fired up to stop him and even forces a fumble early.

He seems to take it as a challenge and just becomes impossible to bring down with less than three men as the game goes on. He’s an adequate pass catcher but was a limited route runner in the Alabama offense.

He shows solid top-end speed coming downhill as a runner and excels as a one-cut specialist. When he gets up to speed, he’s difficult to bring down but he’s not sudden or quick from a flat start and doesn’t maintain speed laterally at an elite level.

He is a brilliant pass protector, and an adequate lead blocker. Benefited from excellent blocks on most of his long runs and could struggle without support at the next level.

RUSHING

Speed: 3 out of 5

Henry can get going downhill, shown on two long runs against Wisconsin, but it’s more dependent on the blocking to get him to the second level where safeties are usually already in the box to stop him. His top speed would be average in the NFL and slightly above-average burst.

Power: 4 out of 5

He runs angry, for sure. But has more finesse to his game than you’d expect for a man his size. Still, he can hit like a ton of bricks, this especially shows up later in games.

Field Vision: 11 out of 15

While he does a nice job working off blocks, rarely does his ability to read the field jump off of tape. The creases he runs through are fairly obvious and he doesn’t really use the width of the field, preferring straight-line running. This likely limits some of his gains.

Balance: 8 out of 10

While Henry can usually maintain his balance through arm tackles, he can get tripped up easily in the open field. He shows elite balance when bending around the edge.

Break Tackle: 7 out of 10

Henry needs to learn to use his size in this aspect, he should be able to break far more tackles than he does. It’s very good compared to most backs but he should not be brought down in the open-field or hammered at the line one-on-one and he was, at least a few times in the Georgia game.

Moves: 3 out of 5

Uses the juke and stiff arm well, had a half-spin that gained him some extra yards. None of his moves are terribly impressive and he mostly relies on burst and power to gain yards.

Run blocking: 3 out of 5

He’s an adequate lead blocker, but no blocks really stood out on tape as helping spring an offensive player.

RECEIVING

Route running: 3 out of 5

On tape, I saw Henry run 5 screens and a swing pass. He does a really nice job selling the block and whipping around on the screen. The swing was all right but he didn’t find the open space. Not much to see here. He should be adequate.

Hands: 8 out of 10

In 6 passes, he had one drop. The drop was more the result of a lack of concentration than anything else.

Run after catch: 3 out of 5

On the screens, he shows surprising wiggle to make defenders miss, there’s just not enough data to project much better.

Blocking: 2 out of 5

Looks lackadaisical at times and on a few plays would have been burned if the play had shifted back to his side, he takes plays off when he doesn’t expect the ball.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 5 out of 5

Henry gets solid pad level, squares up and pops with authority. He’s rarely out-leveraged and also has a really effective cut block.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

He never gives up sacks and rarely gives up pressure.

Potential: 10 out of 10

Has the frame and mean streak to be dominant in this aspect for as long as he plays in the pros.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 75/100

NFL Comparison: James Starks, RB, Packers

StarksHenry 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are really no perfect comparisons for Henry in the NFL. He’s an uncommon specimen at his size but he and Starks are long one-cut runners who have good burst and run with power. They use field vision to set up blocks in the short area and accelerate into the secondary. Both are adequate pass catchers and Starks has shown he’s a solid volume runner when he’s had opportunities to start over Eddie Lacy.

Robert Nkemdiche, DT Scouting Report

Robert Nkemdiche, DE/DT, Ole Miss

6’5 293 lbs

Nkemdiche

OVERVIEW

Height, weight, speed is impressive. Looks like a much smaller man, built very well. Impressive burst upfield, good array of pass rush moves.

Heavy penetrator but not very patient, can take himself out of plays and does often. Comparable against the run versus pass, probably a better pass rusher though. Can get washed out by double teams and beaten by talent one-on-one.

Plays like a much smaller man and needs to learn to use his size to dominate, that comes with understanding of pad level. He uses swim, rip, spin and can slide through double teams with ease when pass rushing. He’s also as sure a tackler as there is in this draft.

PASS RUSHING

Technique: 5 out of 5

Nkemdiche is an impressive technician, using a wide array of moves to work his way to the quarterback. His rip and swim moves are his best, but he uses the spin move better than most. He has the abiltiy to slide through double teams with ease or beat guards one on one.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

His sack numbers were very strong from the defensive tackle position. He has elite pass rushing ability inside and showed it by being a constant presence in the middle of the pocket.

Potential: 5 out of 5

With his impressive size, athleticism and pass rush moves, there’s no reason to believe Nkemdiche couldn’t evolve into one of the NFL’s most disruptive inside rushers.

RUN STOPPING

Technique: 3 out of 5

While he’s effective at clogging gaps and disengaging from blockers, he gets washed out by double teams due to poor pad level. This will be a problem at the defensive tackle position since he will be asked to take up double teams more often than not, unless he’s paired with another elite rusher. He slides between linemen with more grace than most.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

His tackle numbers are fairly on par for the position and amount of games (11) he played in 2015. But what really impresses is Nkemdiche’s ability to wrap up and bring down the ball carrier by himself in space. He is such an effective tackler that an inside position should just increase his value.

Potential: 3 out of 5

The one thing that keeps Nkemdiche from being an elite prospect against the run on the inside is his slightly low play strength compared to his size. He should be able to push his assignment more than he does. Other than that, he has all of the tools and could find a niche as an explosive play specialist.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 26/30

NFL Comparison: Ndamokung Suh, DT, Miami Dolphins

SuhNkemdiche 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In terms of being a sheer mismatch on the inside with freaky athleticism for his size, Nkemdiche reminds me a lot of Suh. Nkemdiche doesn’t have the sack numbers, but I believe they’ll come at the next level under some NFL coaching.

Robert Nkemdiche, 3-4 DE Scouting Report

Robert Nkemdiche, DE/DT, Ole Miss

6’5 293 lbs

Nkemdiche

OVERVIEW

Height, weight, speed is impressive. Looks like a much smaller man, built very well. Impressive burst upfield, good array of pass rush moves.

Heavy penetrator but not very patient, can take himself out of plays and does often. Comparable against the run versus pass, probably a better pass rusher though. Can get washed out by double teams and beaten by talent one-on-one.

Plays like a much smaller man and needs to learn to use his size to dominate, that comes with understanding of pad level. He uses swim, rip, spin and can slide through double teams with ease when pass rushing. He’s also as sure a tackler as there is in this draft.

PASS RUSHING

Technique: 5 out of 5

Nkemdiche is an impressive technician, using a wide array of moves to work his way to the quarterback. His rip and swim moves are his best, but he uses the spin move better than most. He has the abiltiy to slide through double teams with ease or beat guards one on one.

Effectiveness: 4 out of 5

His sack numbers were on par for a 3-4 DE prospect. He has elite pass rushing ability from the position and showed it by being a constant presence in the middle of the pocket.

Potential: 5 out of 5

With his impressive size, athleticism and pass rush moves, there’s no reason to believe Nkemdiche couldn’t evolve into one of the NFL’s most disruptive inside rushers.

RUN STOPPING

Technique: 4 out of 5

While he’s effective at clogging gaps and disengaging from blockers, he gets washed out by double teams due to poor pad level. This is, however, less of a problem in a 3-4 since his nose will likely be seeing more attention than him. He slides between linemen with more grace than most.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

His tackle numbers are fairly on par for the position and amount of games (11) he played in 2015. But what really impresses is Nkemdiche’s ability to wrap up and bring down the ball carrier by himself in space. He is such an effective tackler that an inside position should just increase his value.

Potential: 4 out of 5

The one thing that keeps Nkemdiche from being an elite prospect against the run on the inside is his slightly low play strength compared to his size. He should be able to push his assignment more than he does. Other than that, he has all of the tools and could find a niche as an explosive play specialist.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 27/30

NFL Comparison: Sheldon Richardson, DE, New York Jets

RichardsonNkemdiche 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A near match in terms of size. Nkemdiche shares Richardson’s natural pass rush gifts despite his bigger size. Both have elite short area quickness which they use to split double teams and wreak havoc in the backfield. Both are also better pass rushers than run defenders.

A Prospect A Day: 4-3 Defensive Ends, Robert Nkemdiche Scouting Report

Robert Nkemdiche, DE/DT, Ole Miss

6’5 293 lbs

Nkemdiche

OVERVIEW

Height, weight, speed is impressive. Looks like a much smaller man, built very well. Impressive burst upfield, good array of pass rush moves.

Heavy penetrator but not very patient, can take himself out of plays and does often. Comparable against the run versus pass, probably a better pass rusher though. Can get washed out by double teams and beaten by talent one-on-one.

Plays like a much smaller man and needs to learn to use his size to dominate, that comes with understanding of pad level. He uses swim, rip, spin and can slide through double teams with ease when pass rushing. He’s also as sure a tackler as there is in this draft.

PASS RUSHING

Technique: 4 out of 5

Nkemdiche is an impressive technician, using a wide array of moves to work his way to the quarterback. His rip and swim moves are his best, but he uses the spin move better than most. He has the balance to get around the edge but the bend is still being developed.

Effectiveness: 3 out of 5

His sack numbers were low, but rushing from primarily the DT spot limited his opportunities. On tape, he’s a consistent presence in disrupting the quarterback and forcing the ball out quicker.

Potential: 5 out of 5

With his impressive size, athleticism and pass rush moves, there’s no reason to believe Nkemdiche couldn’t evolve into one of the NFL’s most dangerous rushers on the edge of a 4-3.

RUN STOPPING

Technique: 3 out of 5

While he’s effective at clogging gaps and disengaging from blockers, he gets washed out by double teams due to poor pad level. He slides between linemen with more grace than most, though.

Effectiveness: 4 out of 5

His tackle numbers are fairly on par for the position and amount of games (11) he played in 2015. But what really impresses is Nkemdiche’s ability to wrap up and bring down the ball carrier by himself in space.

Potential: 4 out of 5

The one thing that keeps Nkemdiche from being an elite prospect against the run on the edge is his finesse nature as a player. He doesn’t appear to have the ability to anchor and hold against stronger lineman. Other than that, he has all of the tools and could find a niche as an explosive play specialist.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 23/30

NFL Comparison: Mario Williams, DE, Buffalo Bills

Mario Williams, Cam NewtonNkemdiche 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps a lofty comparison, Williams is the best pass rushing 4-3 end in the league, using his size to dominate and complete array of pass rush moves to beat tackles of all sizes and skill sets. Rushing off the edge, Nkemdiche is the most complete pass rusher in this draft and easily the most pro ready. He might have 10 sacks by year 2 in the right system.