Scouting Report: Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma

Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma

NCAA Football: College Football Playoff Semifinal-Orange Bowl-Alabama vs Oklahoma

Height: 5’10 Weight: 207 lbs.

Tape Viewed: 2018 vs. Texas, 2018 vs. UCLA, 2018 vs. West Virginia, 2018 vs. Alabama (Orange Bowl)

 

OVERVIEW

Murray is a unique prospect, in that his stature is so striking, even at the college level. One could imagine once Murray takes an NFL huddle, the difference will be all the more accentuated. Trailblazers like Drew Brees, Russel Wilson and Doug Flutie have shown the workaround for extremely gifted QBs who are height-challenged. The key is finding passing lanes, and working the protection in the pocket. Another option is to be highly mobile, able to escape the pocket entirely and improvise as plays break down, count Murray in the number of the latter.

With his stark quickness, long speed, ability to navigate blocks, and willingness to take off as soon as he sees lanes forming, Murray is a running quarterback, first and foremost. He thrives most working outside the framework of a traditional NFL offense, much like Aaron Rodgers and Patrick Mahomes. The game is evolving in such a way that players like Murray not only are viable options, they’re becoming the new ideal. His arm talent, too, is impressive, but his scattershot accuracy brings questions about his ability to consistently keep his completion percentage in the high 60’s. Regardless, his big play potential and clear intelligence and patience will make him a player that has a high chance of early success.

 

PASSING

Accuracy: 10 out of 15

The actual mechanics of Murray’s game display his lack of experience. His footwork constantly affects his accuracy, even on passes he completes. He flashes incredible accuracy, especially deep downfield, but can miss simple throws because of his happy feet and lack of a tight release.

 

Power: 3 out of 5

Flashes functional throw power for most throws that will be asked of him, but will never be considered as having a rocket arm. Struggles driving balls to the sideline from the opposite hash.

 

On the run: 3 out of 5

This is where Murray’s best and worst plays tend to occur. Especially on one deep TD against Alabama, Murray throws an absolute dime in a full forward sprint. However, Murray also puts balls behind, too high, and too low, often on film. Most of those throws are when he’s scrambling.

 

Consistency: 8 out of 10

Murray typically plays at an extremely high level for a college player, displaying an excellent understanding of situational football. There are occasional bizarre lapses, where all fundamentals go out the window and he can look fully out of rhythm.

 

Field General: 16 out of 20

Murray does a great job operating his offense, moving around receivers and making strong reads presnap. He struggles with reaching intermediate reads, though he often didn’t need to at school. The system typically had him throwing to his first or second read, and they were usually open. There are occasional flashes of ability to run quickly though 3 or more reads, but it’s rare.

 

Athleticism: 5 out of 5

This is where Murray really shines, he displays incredible acceleration, and sufficient top speed to run away from top-level college defenses. His ability to work outside the script makes him a dangerous threat on every play.

 

Pocket awareness: 9 out of 10

While Murray does an excellent job using his pocket, and moving around it, he doesn’t often step up. This hasn’t gotten him into much trouble yet, but bares watching going forward.

 

Poise: 10 out of 10

Murray’s best comes out in big games, as the game against Bama displays, he showed heightened ability even from his incredible standards.

 

Clutch: 5 out of 5

Murray is definitely a late-game QB, he has a knack for rallies, as well as closing out close, hard-fought victories, with intelligent decision making.

 

Size: 2 out of 5

Clearly lacking ideal size, Murray’s slight frame could become an injury concern and will give many teams pause.

 

Reliability: 8 out of 10

 

Murray has had no injury issues, It’s a small sample size, but he’s been available consistently. However, there has been differing word on his interviewing ability and recall at the whiteboard. To me, this is a minor red-flag, because this could very well be a smokescreen.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 79/100

 

Pro Comparison: Doug Flutie, QB, Retired

Murray 1

Doug-flutie

Flutie was a diminutive quarterback that took his height limitations and crafted an incredibly unique and explosive game around his strengths. Both Flutie and Murray are outstanding natural runners, though with the nature of the game as it is today, Murray should expect far more career rushing yardage than Flutie’s 1634. Just as Flutie was a sensation and sparkplug for any team he suited up for, Murray definitely has that star quality needed to be a top-level NFL QB.

 

As always, drop your slant in the comments section by hitting the “Leave a Comment” button at the top of the article. If you enjoyed, find us on Facebook and Twitter, links below:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants/?ref=br_rs

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sportsslants

Scouting Report: Mitch Trubisky

By: Shae Dougall

Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina

6’2”, 222lbs

Trubisky

Tape Viewed:

North Carolina vs Stanford (2016)

North Carolina vs Florida State (2016)

North Carolina vs Miami (2016)

 

OVERVIEW

Mitchell Trubisky (also known as #MitchNotMitchell) is the young, talented up-and-coming quarterback out of North Carolina who is likely to fly up draft boards on draft day due to his immense talent, big arm, lack of injury history, intangibles, and a bunch of other things that NFL GMs moan about in their sleep. In my opinion, Mitch is being underrated in the draft process, as I think he could eventually develop into a Diet Aaron Rodgers type of player (more on that later).


Mitch is also technically a dual-threat QB who ran a boatload of read option plays in college, so he’d be well-suited to go to a team that is willing to let him tote the ball a bit, because he has a lot of experience in that area. As a result of these read option plays, Mitch will need to learn how to drop back in a proper, traditional NFL offense, but there’s no reason he can’t be successful as we recently saw Derek Carr and Marcus Mariota excellently transition from shotgun shotfun to taking snaps from under center. The key for Mitch is landing spot, he’ll need to find a situation where he can continue to develop. If he’s forced to start right away, I fear a worse fate than the perennially underwhelming Ryan Tannehill. Though again, this is not a knock on Mitch’s talent level, but rather his relative inexperience as a signal caller.

 

PASSING

 

Accuracy: 12.5 out of 15

Short- No issues on any quick routes or screens.

Intermediate- The first tape I watched had Mitch hitting an 18 yard streaking receiver into the endzone between two defenders. The window was fairly tight, and taught me all I needed to know about Mitch’s willingness to throw into coverage and to do so with excellent accuracy. Another note: Mitch completes 62.1% of his intermediate passes, easily outstripping other QBs in this class. I also saw him throw behind a receiver and throw a pretty bad interception, so

Deep- Mitch has a big enough arm and throws with enough velocity to consistently attempt the deep pass, but he’ll need to work on his accuracy in this area. He overthrew receivers a lot, which is at least better than underthrowing.

 

Power: 5 out of 5

Mitch has a big arm. There is no denying that. The ball explodes out of his hand with jaw-dropping velocity. I actually wonder if he can put consistent touch on his passes, but that’s a concern for a different category.

 

On the run: 5 out of 5

Mitch is absolutely brilliant on the run. I saw quite a few opportunities at the end of the Stanford game where he had to escape the rush and then make off balance intermediate-length throws without setting his feet…and he nailed every one of them. Unfortunately, almost all of them were dropped by the receivers!

 

Consistency: 7.5 out of 10

It was a little concerning that Mitch only started for one full season of his entire college career, and the team wasn’t particularly great during his tenure as the starter. This is a very hard category to judge because of the lack of data and tape to go off of, but it’s definitely concerning that he can complete 81.5% of his passes at Florida State and then hit under 40% at home against Virginia Tech the very next week! What the heck?

Generally, though, Mitch had a great season and very few head-scratching games. I’ll give him what I believe to be a fair score for a strong season.

 

Field General: 17.5 out of 20

Arguable the most important category for any quarterback is his ability to read the field and understand where pressure is coming from, in addition to understanding where the ball needs to be placed. Mitch is solid in both categories, making up for his slight blitz reading deficiencies with exceptional read quickness. He is very, very good at determining the assignments of downfield safeties, and I trust him to not make too many crushing mistakes. With just one year of starting experience, Mitch has so far shown tremendous potential to get even better.

 

Athleticism: 4 out of 5

Great speed and lower body explosiveness to get away from oncoming defensive ends. Frequently ran read option plays out of shotgun, so he clearly has the ability to outspeed slower defensive edge players and break through weak tackle attempts.

 

Pocket awareness: 8 out of 10

Competent in the pocket by any definition, but it remains to be seen whether or not Mitch has the ability to drop back in a traditional NFL offense, since 100% of his college snaps came out of the shotgun.

 

Poise: 10 out of 10

Mitch is consistently ready to go in any and all pressure situations. He can dodge defenders and make plays down the field with flair and spectacular awareness.

 

Clutch: 4 out of 5

Came up just short against Stanford in the Sun Bowl, but did have a spectacular final drive that featured no fewer than 4 dropped touchdown passes and terrible offensive line work. Lost close games against Duke and NC State (tape not viewed), but engineered a terrific game-winning drive against Florida State early in the season.

 

Size: 4 out of 5

Mitch has decent height at 6’2”. Plays at an appropriate weight for his height.

 

Reliability: 9.5 out of 10

Mitch is tough both mentally and physically, never missing a game due to injury or choking under pressure due to mental fatigue. Despite only being 6’2”, he plays much bigger than his advertised size, and probably won’t suffer too many early NFL career wear-and-tear related injuries since he rode the bench for much of his college tenure.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 87/100

 

Pro Comparison: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers

Trubisky 1

Rodgers

Okay, don’t freak out. I know that there is almost no way that Mitch will reach the career heights of Aaron Rodgers. But the category says to look for similarities in play styles and the number one thing that sticks out to me is how much Mitch is willing to gun the ball in there every single time. Seriously, the ball explodes out of his hands and he has great short and intermediate accuracy. Both players stand 6’2” and have the same playing weight. Both have outstanding read-the-field ability. WHAT MORE COULD YOU POSSIBLY ASK FOR? Can you tell I love the prospect of Mitch Trubisky under center for an NFL franchise? Time shall tell if he works out, but my money is on Mr. Ohio.

https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants