Scouting Report: Mitch Trubisky

By: Shae Dougall

Mitch Trubisky, QB, North Carolina

6’2”, 222lbs

Trubisky

Tape Viewed:

North Carolina vs Stanford (2016)

North Carolina vs Florida State (2016)

North Carolina vs Miami (2016)

 

OVERVIEW

Mitchell Trubisky (also known as #MitchNotMitchell) is the young, talented up-and-coming quarterback out of North Carolina who is likely to fly up draft boards on draft day due to his immense talent, big arm, lack of injury history, intangibles, and a bunch of other things that NFL GMs moan about in their sleep. In my opinion, Mitch is being underrated in the draft process, as I think he could eventually develop into a Diet Aaron Rodgers type of player (more on that later).


Mitch is also technically a dual-threat QB who ran a boatload of read option plays in college, so he’d be well-suited to go to a team that is willing to let him tote the ball a bit, because he has a lot of experience in that area. As a result of these read option plays, Mitch will need to learn how to drop back in a proper, traditional NFL offense, but there’s no reason he can’t be successful as we recently saw Derek Carr and Marcus Mariota excellently transition from shotgun shotfun to taking snaps from under center. The key for Mitch is landing spot, he’ll need to find a situation where he can continue to develop. If he’s forced to start right away, I fear a worse fate than the perennially underwhelming Ryan Tannehill. Though again, this is not a knock on Mitch’s talent level, but rather his relative inexperience as a signal caller.

 

PASSING

 

Accuracy: 12.5 out of 15

Short- No issues on any quick routes or screens.

Intermediate- The first tape I watched had Mitch hitting an 18 yard streaking receiver into the endzone between two defenders. The window was fairly tight, and taught me all I needed to know about Mitch’s willingness to throw into coverage and to do so with excellent accuracy. Another note: Mitch completes 62.1% of his intermediate passes, easily outstripping other QBs in this class. I also saw him throw behind a receiver and throw a pretty bad interception, so

Deep- Mitch has a big enough arm and throws with enough velocity to consistently attempt the deep pass, but he’ll need to work on his accuracy in this area. He overthrew receivers a lot, which is at least better than underthrowing.

 

Power: 5 out of 5

Mitch has a big arm. There is no denying that. The ball explodes out of his hand with jaw-dropping velocity. I actually wonder if he can put consistent touch on his passes, but that’s a concern for a different category.

 

On the run: 5 out of 5

Mitch is absolutely brilliant on the run. I saw quite a few opportunities at the end of the Stanford game where he had to escape the rush and then make off balance intermediate-length throws without setting his feet…and he nailed every one of them. Unfortunately, almost all of them were dropped by the receivers!

 

Consistency: 7.5 out of 10

It was a little concerning that Mitch only started for one full season of his entire college career, and the team wasn’t particularly great during his tenure as the starter. This is a very hard category to judge because of the lack of data and tape to go off of, but it’s definitely concerning that he can complete 81.5% of his passes at Florida State and then hit under 40% at home against Virginia Tech the very next week! What the heck?

Generally, though, Mitch had a great season and very few head-scratching games. I’ll give him what I believe to be a fair score for a strong season.

 

Field General: 17.5 out of 20

Arguable the most important category for any quarterback is his ability to read the field and understand where pressure is coming from, in addition to understanding where the ball needs to be placed. Mitch is solid in both categories, making up for his slight blitz reading deficiencies with exceptional read quickness. He is very, very good at determining the assignments of downfield safeties, and I trust him to not make too many crushing mistakes. With just one year of starting experience, Mitch has so far shown tremendous potential to get even better.

 

Athleticism: 4 out of 5

Great speed and lower body explosiveness to get away from oncoming defensive ends. Frequently ran read option plays out of shotgun, so he clearly has the ability to outspeed slower defensive edge players and break through weak tackle attempts.

 

Pocket awareness: 8 out of 10

Competent in the pocket by any definition, but it remains to be seen whether or not Mitch has the ability to drop back in a traditional NFL offense, since 100% of his college snaps came out of the shotgun.

 

Poise: 10 out of 10

Mitch is consistently ready to go in any and all pressure situations. He can dodge defenders and make plays down the field with flair and spectacular awareness.

 

Clutch: 4 out of 5

Came up just short against Stanford in the Sun Bowl, but did have a spectacular final drive that featured no fewer than 4 dropped touchdown passes and terrible offensive line work. Lost close games against Duke and NC State (tape not viewed), but engineered a terrific game-winning drive against Florida State early in the season.

 

Size: 4 out of 5

Mitch has decent height at 6’2”. Plays at an appropriate weight for his height.

 

Reliability: 9.5 out of 10

Mitch is tough both mentally and physically, never missing a game due to injury or choking under pressure due to mental fatigue. Despite only being 6’2”, he plays much bigger than his advertised size, and probably won’t suffer too many early NFL career wear-and-tear related injuries since he rode the bench for much of his college tenure.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 87/100

 

Pro Comparison: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers

Trubisky 1

Rodgers

Okay, don’t freak out. I know that there is almost no way that Mitch will reach the career heights of Aaron Rodgers. But the category says to look for similarities in play styles and the number one thing that sticks out to me is how much Mitch is willing to gun the ball in there every single time. Seriously, the ball explodes out of his hands and he has great short and intermediate accuracy. Both players stand 6’2” and have the same playing weight. Both have outstanding read-the-field ability. WHAT MORE COULD YOU POSSIBLY ASK FOR? Can you tell I love the prospect of Mitch Trubisky under center for an NFL franchise? Time shall tell if he works out, but my money is on Mr. Ohio.

https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants

Scouting Report: Solomon Thomas

NOTE: Please remember to drop your slant in the comments section by clicking the “Leave a comment” button above and to the right of this article. Also, feel free and encouraged to like us on Facebook and follow on Twitter, links below the article.

Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford

6’3 273 lbs.

Thomas

Tape Viewed: 2016 vs. Kansas State, 2016 vs. Arizona, 2016 vs. Colorado, 2016 vs. North Carolina

 

OVERVIEW

Solomon Thomas stands out for his versatility, tenacity, quickness and sound hand usage. He’s also, by all indications, a fantastic guy with great work ethic that would fit in well in most locker rooms. He’s lacking the height that would ideally couple with a 270 pound frame on a defensive end which has caused some teams to view him as a tweener prospect.

None of that will matter once he hits training camp though, it will be clear immediately once the pads come on what kind of incredible prospect Thomas is. He could just be scratching the surface of his potential as he continues to learn the position on the edge.

He lacks the ideal bend that elite prospects have, but makes up for it with outstanding understanding of what an offense wants to do. This is on display against North Carolina as he tears up field towards Trubisky but pulls up on a dime and stops the screen back for no gain.

 

PASS RUSH

 

Moves: 5 out of 5

Rip and swim moves are Thomas’ bread and butter. The more tape I watched though, the more I saw him attack different opponents with different plans. He sometimes employed spin moves (to great effect) sometimes opted for straight up bull rushes, and sometimes he’d even win (both inside and outside) with his outstanding explosiveness on a speed rush.

 

Technique: 13 out of 15

The name of Thomas’ game is technically sound. He plays under control at all times, with nearly elite hand usage. He loves punching lineman away, which makes sense as he developed his game in the boxing ring. However, he can sometimes get his feet tangled and he’s still learning how to play on the outside as he lined up at 4-3 DT so much for Stanford.

 

Bend: 2 out of 5

This is the one area that will likely hold teams back from drafting Thomas in the Top 10, if they envision as a 4-3 DE. He doesn’t show natural ability to bend around tackles, and doesn’t even seem to understand how to do this. He tried once that I saw on tape, and it was almost hilariously bad. However, his balance and athleticism would suggest that he has potential to develop in this part of his game.

 

Finish: 4 out of 5

There are some frustrating misses for Thomas on tape, but they’re few and far between. In particular, one play in the Arizona game where he did a spin move to the inside, then chased the quarterback all the way to the sideline to force the incompletion shows Thomas’ ability to affect the game other than on the stat sheet.

 

Tenacity: 4 out of 5

Ordinarily, you will see Thomas showing off his exceptional motor straight to the whistle. But he also seems to have an understanding of when to turn the jets off since he can no longer affect the play. Because of this, sometimes he’s wrong and gives up on plays too quickly.

 

Consistency: 10 out of 10

What you see is what you get with Thomas on any given down. He’s an above average pass rusher that tries really hard and is physically intimidating.

 

RUN STOPPING

 

Edge Setting: 6 out of 10

Often on tape, Thomas shows his inexperience in this aspect, allowing lanes to form as he has the wrong leverage, however, there are some flashes that show his potential in the pros.

 

Tackling: 9 out of 10

Thomas misses some tackles, but very few, and even when he misses, he’s almost always a part of the reason the play ends prematurely. Besides that, he’s vicious, and delivers some serious body slams. A play early in the North Carolina game shows this aspect of his game quite brilliantly.

 

Double Teams: 4 out of 5

Thomas has the functional strength, leverage, and balance to consistently take on double teams through the whistle, though it would be nice to see him make more plays when he gets the extra attention.

 

Lane Discipline: 9 out of 10

On tape, there are some exceptional plays that show just how deep an understanding Thomas has of lane discipline and how to properly set up a team defense, and then there are plays like the one against Kansas State where he allows the QB to scoot right by him untouched for a 20 yard gain. Those are rare.

 

Consistency: 9 out of 10

I’ve seen on nearly every report of Thomas that he’s an outstanding run defender, PFF graded him number one among draft eligible players in fact. However, I do see times where his play falls off, particularly when he’s receiving extra attention or being stretched horizontally.

 

GENERAL

 

Reliability: 10 out of 10

Thomas is as rock solid as it gets. Seems to have the mentality any NFL GM would love. No character issues or injury question marks to speak of.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 85 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Michael Bennett, DE, Seattle Seahawks

Rice Stanford Football

Bennett

Though a lofty comparison for a player that hasn’t played a single down in the NFL, there really isn’t another player in the NFL that has the quickness and inside pass-rush ability, mixed with effective run defense like Bennett. Bennett has found a perfect niche as the designated Swiss army knife in Seattle’s defense, and has become one of the league’s best. I believe Thomas has that level of ability, but must find the right role to maximize  his potential. To me, a lot like Bennett, he’s a high floor high ceiling player.

https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants

Scouting Report: DeShone Kizer

NOTE: Please remember to drop your slant in the comments section by clicking the “Leave a comment” button above and to the right of this article. Also, feel free and encouraged to like us on Facebook and follow on Twitter, links below the article.

DeShone Kizer, QB, Notre Dame

6’4 233 lbs.

Kizer

Tape Viewed: 2015 vs. Stanford, 2015 vs. Ohio State, 2016 vs. Texas, 2016 vs. Michigan State, 2016 vs. Miami

 

OVERVIEW

I’ve had the pleasure to watch every single start of DeShone Kizer’s Notre Dame career and this kid was perhaps the most precocious starter in his first season that I’ve ever seen. His deep accuracy, dropping dimes to current Houston Texans wide receiver Will Fuller especially, was jaw-dropping. He complimented that with a poise and moxie that rivaled NFL veterans.

People forget that Kizer led a comeback and was within a two-point conversion of knocking off Clemson in 2015 (Clemson would go on to be undefeated until the National Championship). This was all with a relative lack of NFL talent surrounding him, and a very poor defense that he was forced to make up for week in and week out.

2016 was more of the same for Kizer, except with a worse defense, and replacing Will Fuller with some tall guy named Equanimeous St. Brown. The point being, the talent around him got even worse, and he felt the pressure to will his poor team to wins. The struggles were predictable, and partly the fault of Kizer for setting his original bar so high. Kizer’s 2016 season is a very difficult study because it was such an unstable situation all year in South Bend.

 

PASSING

 

Accuracy: 12 out of 15

Kizer is the most accurate deep passer in this draft, and his accuracy on deep passes rivals anyone in the NFL. He has unbelievable touch to drop it to deep streaking receivers in stride. Kizer also flashes incredible accuracy on intermediate and short throws, but has strange lapses that could potentially be due to his inconsistent footwork and incredibly live arm.

 

Power: 4 out of 5

Can throw a heat-seeking missile at times: look no further than the Texas game with Kizer throwing to receiver Torri Hunter Jr. between 3 defenders. However, there are strange lapses in which Kizer’s velocity on short and intermediate throws fizzles.

 

On the run: 5 out of 5

Kizer can run off to the left, or the right, and throw an accurate ball without setting his feet. He can reach any area of the field, or work the sideline. It’s pretty incredible.

 

Consistency: 7 out of 10

This rating should seemingly be lower, with the huge disparity in wins from year one as a starter to year two. However, Kizer himself doesn’t see many drop offs in his overall game. The talent around him is often what lets him down. You’ll see this constantly, especially in the 2016 tape where three of the starters on his offensive line have no business being on the field.

 

Field General: 17 out of 20

Works through his reads quickly and naturally. Very decisive when he sees what he likes. He does have a tendency to tuck and run rather than take an easy underneath completion, but it really depends on the flow of the game. When Kizer is in a rhythm, he’s as decisive as you could ask for and usually gets it to the right guy.

 

Athleticism: 5 out of 5

For a player his size, he’s an incredibly fluid and natural athlete. He flashes impressive balance against the blitz, weaves in and out of run lanes with ease and can get skinny or even vertical when seeking the pylon on a rushing TD attempt.

 

Pocket awareness: 8 out of 10

Kizer is never taken unaware. He feels pressure immediately and slides in the pocket with very sudden moves. The problem is that he sometimes doesn’t trust his protection which causes him to feel pressure when it isn’t quite there.

 

Poise: 9 out of 10

Much more often than not, Kizer thrives under pressure. He can deliver a pinpoint accurate ball from any number of contorted poses, and he loves to stretch a defense on a broken-down play.

 

Clutch: 4 out of 5

All of Kizer’s biggest games of his career feature solid to outstanding individual performances by him. In fact, his game against Stanford in 2015 for a CFB Playoff bid was perhaps the best of his career. The knock though, is he lost that game, and the bowl game against Ohio State, and the game against Clemson. It’s a slight concern.

 

Size: 5 out of 5

He is the quarterback prototype, in every single way.

 

Reliability: 9 out of 10

Kizer is sturdy, he doesn’t get banged up despite his very physical style of play. The only slight concern here is the issues he had with Coach Brian Kelly at Notre Dame and why he never quite seemed to get the keys to the Ferrari, so to speak.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 85 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Randall Cunningham, QB, Retired

Kizer 1

Cunningham

This comparison comes with a slight caveat: this is the Vikings’ Randall Cunningham, later in his career when he allowed his exceptional natural abilities as a passer to shine through. Cunningham and Kizer share that uncanny ability to deliver perfect passes running off to the left and right. They’re both outstanding natural runners that thrive on deep ball accuracy but flash accuracy to all areas of the field. Most of all, both appear to be very difficult to rattle and are borderline-unstoppable when in a rhythm. They also both happen to be prototype physical specimens.

 

https://www.facebook.com/sportsslants

Mock Draft 1.0 (Picks 21-26)

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Check out these and catch up on the rest on the NFL Draft page

Mock Draft 1.0 Picks 21-26

21 bengals Alvin Dupree, OLB, Kentucky

The Bengals have been searching for a missing piece for years to put them over the Wild Card hump. While Andy Dalton is 0-4 in the playoffs, the fact that he got there four times shows that there’s something good going on for this team. Dalton is good enough to get the ball to A.J. Green, which should be adequate, and it could be, but they have to generate a pass rush. The Bengals were dead last in sacks last year.

How about an edge rusher with all the upside in the world who can immediately contribute as a package player and may surprise with even more production? Some are very high on Alvin Dupree, top-10 high, the board didn’t fall that way, much to the Bengals delight, so they snag the last true first-round talent at edge rusher. There’s a possibility he could end up being the best of the bunch; his measurables are insane. He does a nice job setting the edge in the run, but he’s often fooled on free releases during screens, so his awareness has got to raise in the NFL or teams will burn him for it.

Bud-Dupree

It’s Ok Bud, no one can bring him down

Height: 6’4

Weight: 269 lbs.

2014 Stats: 74 tackles, 12.5 tackles for loss, 7.5 sacks, interception, 2 forced fumbles

Projection: Rotational player

Floor: journeyman

Ceiling: All-pro

NFL Comparison: Aldon Smith (OLB, San Francisco 49ers)- possessing the desired size and frame, can get after the quarterback, relentless on every down, can also set the edge in the run, but must work on fundamentals and technique, has a tendency to gamble and it doesn’t always pay off

22 pit-steelers-revolution Kevin Johnson, CB, Wake Forest

After watching Dupree get snagged, the Steelers finally have to get serious about upgrading the corner position; one they’ve neglected since Keenan Lewis left for New Orleans. Ike Taylor is done and Brice McCain is a second corner at best. Unfortunately there are no first round safeties available, which is also a huge need, so they grab a corner that is probably the most ready to contribute right away.

He needs to put on a few pounds, but Johnson has the prototypical frame, the coverage skills, athleticism and, most importantly, a nonstop motor. He’s a three year starter at Wake Forest who has loose hips and quick-twitch traits to close on the ball at the point of the catch. He’s a true cover corner but is known to respect the deep ball too much and can give up receptions that way. That means he’s also susceptible to back shoulder throws which will cause a decent learning curve in the NFL. He’ll be an excellent gunner on special teams from day one.

1107_Kevin-Johnson_inside

Quit slouchin’

Height: 6’0

Weight: 188 lbs.

2014 Stats: 44 tackles, 6 passes broken up, 1 interception, 1 touchdown

Projection: Above-average starter

Floor: Average nickel corner

Ceiling: Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Darrelle Revis (CB, New York Jets)- prototypical height, highly impressive mirroring abilities in press coverage, feisty play demeanor with that unteachable ability to get away with penalties.

23 Lions 2 Andrus Peat, OT, Stanford

The Lions would love an impact player on the defensive line here since the cupboard is now bare behind recent acquisition Haloti Ngata, but there are no more first round talents at the spot. With no trade partners, they snag a player in Andrus Peat who has slid a bit more than expected. Many have him as a top 3 offensive tackle in this year’s draft and some have hailed him as the most pro-ready as a bookend.

Peat is an absolute technician which will give him plenty of reps early on in his career but he has to continue to develop as an athlete and learn to be meaner. He will get pushed around at the next level against big, heavy bull rushers which is concerning since edge rushers are so big at the pro level. He can handle the speed rush beautifully with exceptionally quick feet and a nice, legal hooking move in case they get outside his hip. He’s solid, but unspectacular as a run blocker and must be more proactive in that phase. He needs to learn to use his massive frame and get better pad level. If he can do that, the Lions will have a top-5 talent here at 23.

APeat

You do the hokey pokey

Height: 6’7

Weight: 313 lbs.

Projection: Above-average starter

Floor: Average starter

Ceiling: Pro Bowl left tackle

NFL Comparison: Matt Kalil (LT, Minnesota Vikings)- With exceptional feet and hands, can handle speed rushers with ease but susceptible to bull rush, needs to refine technique and build strength in legs to become a more effective run blocker.

24 3001624_SP_Cardinals_2 Todd Gurley, RB, Georgia

Yes, the Cardinals could always use more defensive players, especially with the departure of Darnell Dockett and the aging/unreliable linebackers they currently have. But how long has it been since the Cardinals have had a true, all-world talent at running back? This is a grand opportunity that could potentially open up the play-action which would give Palmer more time to connect on intermediate routes with his big, talented receivers. Not to mention Gurley is ready for primetime, right now. He’s the best running back prospect since Adrian Peterson, hands down.

Watching Gurley play is legitimately exhausting, he churns out the hard yards on nearly every down, he’s got the rare ability to fall forward on almost every run, he possesses a devastating quick cut and excellent burst through holes and into the second level of the defense. Being a dangerous kick returner as well, he knows what to do when he gets there. Gurley is an incredibly fluid athlete with moves that suggest a much smaller man, but he’s large and thick and a load to bring down. You’ll rarely see him go down by one tackler. He’s also an accomplished pass blocker and a natural on screens. The one thing I can see missing from Gurley’s game is a cutback move. A couple of his runs he tends to try to bounce outside where there’s a ton of room with a simple cutback. He develops that and recovers well from injury, he could be looking at 10,000+ career yards. Obviously though, a major knee injury for a running back is a big concern. If he gets back to form, he will be the steal of this draft.

AP TENNESSEE GEORGIA FOOTBALL S FBC T25 USA GA

This guy’s no joke

Height: 6’1

Weight: 222 lbs.

2014 Stats: (6 games) 911 yards, 7.41 per carry, 9 touchdowns, 1 kick return touchdown

Projection: Pro Bowler

Floor: Out of the league due to injury

Ceiling: All-pro

NFL Comparison: Steven Jackson (RB, Free Agent)- With the size and strength of a bulldozer, and an impressive array of juke, stiff arm and spin moves, possesses the speed to streak down the sideline and the balance to wiggle through holes in the A and B gaps of the line. Runs with absolute authority.

25 PanthersTRADE PackersEric Kendricks, LB, UCLA (Panthers Receive 2015 1st, 2016 3rd)

The Packers aren’t going to address this problem before the draft, but their starting inside linebackers are abysmal. A.J. Hawk and Brad Jones are gone, leaving Carl Bradford as the starter alongside Clay Matthews who is better suited as an edge defender. They have to find an answer or this defense will be taking large steps backward. Ted Thompson has shown a willingness to go up and grab a linebacker he liked in the past. That man, Clay Matthews, has worked out pretty well for them.

Eric Kendricks is worth the investment for Green Bay who desperately need better athletes in the middle of their front seven. Kendricks is an incredibly hard worker with a high motor and superior field awareness. He’ll be ready to contribute immediately and may be ready to start immediately. He likely won’t ever be a super star, since he lacks off-the-charts measurables, but he’s a natural as both a run-stopper and in pass coverage. A jack of all trades linebacker, he gives Dom Capers an extremely versatile piece to work into the defensive formula. Kendricks shouldn’t be asked to cover Jimmy Graham, but I think he can handle most tight ends in the league, he’ll be at his best in zone coverage where his superior instincts will help him thrive.

0725_SPO_LDN-L-PAC12-11AH

Opera is a realistic backup plan, right

Height: 6’0

Weight: 232 lbs.

2014 Stats: 145 tackles, 11.5 tackles for loss, 4 sacks, 3 interceptions, 1 touchdown

Projection: Above average starter

Floor: Average starter/backup

Ceiling: Above average starter

NFL Comparison: Stephen Tulloch (LB, Detroit Lions)- A tad undersized, an impact player in coverage and against the run with solid, but unspectacular athleticism, not a force as a pass rusher but very good manning the middle of the defense.

26 Ravens Eddie Goldman, NT, Florida State

The Ravens have to be quick about plugging the hole in their defensive line. Losing starters Pernell McPhee and Haloti Ngata hurt in both run support and pass rush, they need a versatile big man to help ease the transition as they continue to get younger on that side of the ball. They might like a receiver here but Green-Beckham doesn’t strike me as an Ozzie Newsome guy and there will be plenty of potential contributors available in round two.

Eddie Goldman is a savvy defender at the line of scrimmage, he’s smart about disengaging blockers and has great hand usage. What makes him special is his burst for his size, with free releases, he’s on the quarterback in the blink of an eye. He plays with a high motor and is an active fighter, rarely giving up on a play. He must do a better job with anchoring; he plays with his pads too high and gets pushed around against the run as a result. If he’s coached up, this is a man that can do some serious damage as a pass-rushing nose tackle, a rare breed.

Eddie-Goldman-Week-12

Darn, gotta go do lineman stuff

Height: 6’4

Weight: 336 lbs.

2014 Stats: 35 tackles, 8 tackles for loss, 4 sacks

Projection: Above average starter

Floor: Journeyman

Ceiling: Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Michael Brockers (DT, St. Louis Rams)- A force in both pass rush and run defense, savvy lineman who anchors well but can stand to improve with massive frame, pass rush isn’t consistent but certainly flashes, possesses great physical gifts.