Scouting Report: Derek Barnett

Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee

6’3 270 lbs

Barnett

Tape Viewed: 2015 vs. Alabama, 2016 vs. Alabama, 2016 vs. Texas A&M, 2016 vs. Florida

OVERVIEW

Barnett is bizzare to watch play. At times, he looks sluggish beyond belief and yet covers ground quickly. At times he looks like he’s carrying way too much weight on that relatively small (for the position) frame. And yet, you see this outstanding quickness, hand fighting ability, bend around the edge and excellent finish that have made him a premiere sack specialist in the SEC.

Derek Barnett also boasts the experience and consistency against top level competition, at times taking over the entire game against Alabama’s Cam Robinson (also a potential first-rounder). This is the one question mark in Myles Garrett’s game, so it’s certainly encouraging to see Barnett thrive regardless of who he’s lined up against.

PASS RUSH

Moves: 2 out of 5

It seems that this is the area on tape, consistently, where Barnett shows a lack of versatility. He’s pretty much just a finesse rusher, using superior agility and hand fighting to weave his way through lineman. He must add more to the arsenal at the next level.

Technique: 14 out of 15

Of this, Barnett may be among the cleanest in the draft, his hand use, footwork and control of his body allow him to consistently put himself in the correct positions and gain advantages on his opponents where sheer athleticism would seem to indicate that he should be less effective.

Bend: 4 out of 5

This is one of the biggest reasons Barnett was the leading sack specialist in his three-season span in the SEC. He has that uncanny ability to contort his body in any way to get around the edge, and also the knowledge of exactly when to do this for optimal opportunity at the QB. The one concern I’d have here is that he tends to round out his rush at times, though this is only a problem on a few snaps on tape.

Finish: 5 out of 5

This is the other aspect that leads to those insane sack numbers, Barnett knows what to do when he gets home, it’s a sack, a tackle, in fact he had a play where he tipped a pass to himself for an interception. If Barnett is near to making a play, it’s a safe bet he’ll make it.

Tenacity: 4 out of 5

Not to say that Barnett ever takes plays off, on the contrary, he’ll chase across formation when the play is moving away from him, but he seems to realize he doesn’t have the speed to catch plays that go beyond him, and he often doesn’t try.

Consistency: 10 out of 10

What more can you say for a man who has averaged 10+ sacks per season in his 3 years as a starter against the top-level competition he faces playing in college football’s premiere conference? He’s rock solid steady.

RUN STOPPING

Edge Setting: 8 out of 10

The only times I really see this to be an issue is when the play calls for a pass rush, his quickness and anticipation gets him upfield early and can sometimes take him out of running plays.

Tackling: 9 out of 10

While not a perfect tackler, there are very few discernable issues in positioning, technique, want-to or ability to bring down any ball carrier that comes his way. He’ll continue to develop that consistency at the next level and should be among the league’s most reliable.

Double Teams: 3 out of 5

I wouldn’t say that Barnett lacks the functional strength to hold up in double teams, but he does seem to lack the desire to use it, this is shown by his distinct lack of a bull rush, however, he is quite effective at using his finesse to work through double teams and make plays on ball carriers.

Lane Discipline: 10 out of 10

Barnett is as smart and pro-ready as any evaluator could dream in terms of his ability to see offensive plays developing and put himself in the right position to leverage the play to his advantage.

Consistency: 10 out of 10

Honestly, Barnett never looks to be out of position, or tired, or overwhelmed by level of competition and this quality extends to his run defense.

GENERAL

Reliability: 9 out of 10

Though perfectly available throughout his college career, Barnett has been limited in recent weeks (going into his pro day) with a hamstring injury. He is expected to perform regardless, and that’s been Barnett’s MO as a player, but going forward, teams will need to be aware of that potential and keep him in the ice bath after games.

Total Prospect Rating: 89 out of 100

Pro Comparison: Trent Cole, DE, Indianapolis Colts

Barnett 1

Cole

Sharing nearly the exact same dimensions, elite hand and foot technique, ability to get after the quarterback and penchant for punishing hits once they arrive, the comparison came to me pretty immediately. Cole has been an underappreciated impact rusher for most of his career, who boasts an all-around game that suits him to any defense. The kind of skills that Barnett boasts should give him similar versatility. I expect Barnett to get off to a quicker start than Cole, who took a few years before he became elite, production-wise.

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A Prospect A Day: Running Backs, Alex Collins Scouting Report

Alex Collins, RB, Arkansas

5’11 215 lbs

Collins

 

Collins has quicker feet than most running backs ever will. His change of direction ability is automatic and his stop-and-start movement jumps off tape.

He is quick, agile, has adequate burst for longer plays and brilliant vision to set up his blockers. He benefited from running behind an exceptional Arkansas offensive line headlined by top-NFL-prospect Guard Sebastian Tretola.

Still, when it came to contact, Collins seeks it out and hits with a ton of power and aggression. When he really gets going, he lowers his shoulders and plows through contact with the best of them. This is especially impressive considering his relatively low weight.

He’ll probably have to bulk up a bit for the NFL but it’s all well-distributed.

Speed: 3 out of 5

Collins can get around the edge or downhill quickly and with speed, but he can get chased down by linebackers or slower safeties from schools with more talent. He had his most special games against lesser competition for the most part.

Power: 5 out of 5

He’s a guy that seems to love getting hit and delivering it right back. While he has nifty feet, once he chooses his direction, he’s like a runaway freight train.

Field Vision: 15 out of 15

Collins’ field vision was consistently a defining characteristic on his successful gains, he would weave in and out of several lanes using the entire field at his disposal like few others can. He has traits of both a north-south and lateral runner and can do both effectively, often in the same run.

Balance: 9 out of 10

Has some absolutely insane moments in this regard, a few times against Tennessee he was forced parallel to the ground with all of his weight forward and still managed five extra yards and a first down. Shows this same impressive ability when stopping and starting as his momentum doesn’t carry him forward and he’s able to get going immediately rather than lumbering.

Break Tackle: 8 out of 10

Collins shows impressive ability in this area of his game, he can carry several tacklers several yards if they don’t hit him with good form. He’s stronger with good pad level and as a result, when he’s deep in the secondary, he’s easier to bring down since he runs a little too high.

Moves: 5 out of 5

Everything is utilized in Collins’ game, and with the expertise of a wily vet. His feet are so quick that his spin is almost as quick as his juke and he uses the hurdle against opponents’ tendencies to try to chop his legs in the open field since he’s such a tough runner to bring down.

Run blocking: 3 out of 5

He wasn’t asked to do this much at Arkansas but if his pass blocking skills are any indication, he should at least be adequate.

RECEIVING

Route running: 3 out of 5

Collins runs the screen well, but that’s about it. Still, most NFL teams probably won’t ask much more of him, and even if they do, he has the traits to develop well in this aspect (quick feet)

Hands: 6 out of 10

He had 13 catches in his senior season, so there’s just not enough data to make a solid determination. I have it somewhat low because I saw a drop on the only pass that went his way in the tape I watched, though it was well-covered.

Run after catch: 2 out of 5

His 13 catches in his senior season went for only 95 yards, that’s an average of 7.3 yards per catch which was the highest of his college career by almost two yards. He has the traits to be explosive but it just didn’t show up while he was at Arkansas.

Blocking: 3 out of 5

He didn’t run very many routes, but when he did, he was active and effective in attempting to give his receivers running lanes.

PASS PROTECTION

Technique: 5 out of 5

Collins uses his compact frame to be very stout at the point of attack and rebounds most rushers with ease. He shows good recognition skills and rarely gets out leveraged.

Effectiveness: 5 out of 5

There were no issues with his pass protection on tape.

Potential: 10 out of 10

He shows the ability to use his slight lack of size to his advantage and should continue to be stout on the next level.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 82/100

NFL Comparison: DeAngelo Williams, RB, Steelers

DeAngelo WilliamsCollins 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Runs with a great mix of brute strength and nifty movement skills. Possesses the necessary burst to pull away from defenders in the open field and balance to stretch gains far beyond expectation. Williams is a more accomplished pass catcher, but everything that makes him effective in that role, Collins seems to possess.