Scouting Report: Jamal Adams

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Jamal Adams, S, LSU

6’0 214 lbs

Adams

Tape Viewed: 2015 vs. Alabama, 2016 vs. Auburn, 2016 vs. Texas A&M, 2016 vs. Alabama

 

OVERVIEW

Already an outstanding player early in his LSU career, Adams added a new dimension of polish and urgency to his game in his final collegiate season.  Very few plays on tape show Adams even remotely struggling.

While he’s an outstanding in-the-box safety who clearly likes to be close to the ball and set the tone, some of his most impressive plays on tape showcase his insane range playing from the deep middle. One knock I have is that he doesn’t appear to have much experience playing that “last-line-of-defense” role. I do, however, think he projects really well into that role.

He also has an ideally sturdy build which goes well with his rangy, physical style of play. When you think of the term enforcer on a football field, you need look no further.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 14 out of 15

Adams looks like he has a deep intelligence and understanding of the keys to read nearly any offense. There are few times where he appears to be out of position.

 

Speed: 5 out of 5

His 4.56 40 time notwithstanding, Adams’ speed on the field pops on tape constantly. He covers ground so quickly that he often reacts on screens before the receivers do.

 

Pursuit: 8 out of 10

This is a tough one to grade because Adams has the ability to close space so effectively on horizontal plays, but when plays move vertically, he struggles a bit and gives up ground. This doesn’t always happen, but it’s often enough to be notable.

 

Man: 3 out of 5

On a 5-yard out against Texas A&M, Adams runs the route better than the receiver, coming from the middle of the field. This shows his potential and ability to read the hips of receivers. His reaction time is outstanding, but his hips aren’t as fluid as they need to be.

 

Zone: 8 out of 10

The knock I have on Adams here is his ability in deep zone. There are times where he allows receivers to get behind him which is a concern for the next level where better QBs will torch him if he doesn’t clean it up. He does, however, have brilliant plays all over the rest of the field in zone.

 

Tackle: 9 out of 10

Adams uses a player’s momentum and leverage against them by wrapping up their legs and allowing them to take themselves down. This is consistently effective. When a player is already engaged, Adams also knows to go for the ball.

 

Ball Skills: 3 out of 5

In 2015, he had 4 interceptions, but this was an anomaly. While Adams has all of the attributes to be a ball-hawk and didn’t drop any opportunities that I saw, he needs to find a way to be in position to pick the ball off more, or at least rack up more PBU’s.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 8 out of 10

He improved a lot in this regard from early in his career to 2016, where he not only increased his total tackles, but TFL’s to career best. However, as Adams tends to be flying around near the line of scrimmage, he sometimes forgets to sink his hips which causes him to fly off the players he intends to tackle.

 

Play Recognition: 15 out of 15

Adams is pretty unbelievable in this regard. He’s almost always the first to recognize a play-fake. This is showcased in the 2015 game against Alabama on a fake end around bootleg where Adams was the only one that stayed with QB Jake Coker. He turned what was undoubtedly a 15 yard gain into a TFL.

 

Willingness: 5 out of 5

Adams appears to be happiest and most eager on the field mixing it up at the LOS, flying in, even through interior lanes, to be involved in run defense.

 

GENERAL

 

Reliability: 10 out of 10

Adams has the character, squeaky clean injury history, stout frame, leadership qualities and empty rap sheet that makes him among the safest picks in this draft.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 88 out of 100

 

Pro Comparison: Reshad Jones, S, Miami Dolphins

Adams 1

Jones

While Jones is a more accomplished ball-hawk, both players share the same leadership ability, knack for the tone-setting play and outstanding run defense. Jones and Adams share a stout frame which allows them to deliver serious force as tacklers, and serious range to make plays all over the field and rally the defense on any given play.

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Scouting Report: Quincy Wilson

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Quincy Wilson, CB, Florida

6’1 211 lbs.

Wilson

Tape Viewed: 2016 vs. Alabama, 2016 vs. Florida State, 2016 vs. UMASS, 2016 vs. Missouri

 

OVERVIEW

 

Wilson has the look and attitude teams love to see in their cornerbacks. He’s a sturdy player with a tapered but well-proportioned body. For his size, he has impressive functional speed and athleticism while flashing seriously impressive ability in coverage.

He also happens to have enough confidence to fill an open-air stadium, which is clearly visible with his relaxed demeanor on the field. Wilson never panics, never seems to get rattled, and tends to use this ability to get in the head of his opponent. Wilson is an intimidator who likes to use his imposing size down the field to the catch point.

Wilson may never be the superstar he clearly believes he is, but he’s a solid cornerback prospect with a very high floor. As a safety, perhaps he could be a star, he has all the tools but needs to become a more reliable tackler.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 8 out of 10

He’s not elite in his quickness of diagnosing the offensive play, but he has some brilliant reads on tape that result in big plays for the defense.

 

Speed: 4 out of 5

This was a surprising aspect on film, for such a sturdy frame, Wilson is an impressively fluid athlete, showing impressive ability to stay with receivers downfield.

 

Mirroring: 9 out of 10

Another surprise based on his stature, Wilson has perhaps the most natural and technique-sound hip swivel of any prospect in this draft and it serves him very well on nearly every route. There are times where receivers shake him, but it’s not common.

 

Pursuit: 4 out of 5

This ability is very important with all the zone coverage he’s asked to do, Wilson closes as good as or better than most.

 

Man: 12 out of 15

Wilson has every physical attribute and technical skill needed to be a dominant man-corner, he just needs more experience on the island.

 

Zone: 14 out of 15

This is the area where Wilson’s most spectacular plays on tape happen, he flashes exceptional ability to effectively shut down multiple targets with his understanding of spacing and closing speed.

 

Press: 3 out of 5

While this aspect of his game doesn’t come up often, his physicality and imposing size would suggest that he has the ability to throttle refers at the line of scrimmage.

 

Tackle: 3 out of 5

While Wilson has an exceptional ability to get himself in proper position and shows strong form to drive through players, he must have greased up arms, because he flies every which way after bouncing off the player he’s attempting to tackle. This happens often enough to be a decent cause for concern.

 

Ball Skills: 3 out of 5

Only one interception on tape, and a few nice pass breakups, Wilson should be more involved with the ball than he is based on his coverage ability. Perhaps this is something that will develop with experience.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 2 out of 5

Even more egregious are his tackle attempts in the run game. Routinely, whether going high or low against Alabama running back Bo Scarbrough, Wilson looked like a rag doll. Though he kept sticking his nose in there and giving it another go despite Scarbrough’s frightening combination of size and speed.

 

Play Recognition: 3 out of 5

Wilson looks like an ascending player in this regard, showing a decent understanding of how run plays develop. There are a few too many times where he runs with the receiver down the field on delayed handoffs. However, he was among the first to diagnose an incredibly tricky designed run play against Alabama, promptly missing another attempt on Scarbrough in the process.

 

Willingness: 5 out of 5

As mentioned above, Wilson has a nose for the ball and an eagerness to get down and dirty that rivals any cornerback on the NFL level. He’s physical and he loves lining up and attempting to deliver tackles.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 10 out of 10

It doesn’t appear that Wilson missed a single game in college due to injury. There is no cause for concern in this aspect as a prospect.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 80 out of 100

Pro Comparison: Malcolm Jenkins, S, Philadelphia Eagles

Wilson 1

Jenkins

Jenkins was an outstanding prospect back in 2008, a finalist for the Bednarik award (NCAA’s Best Defensive Player) and a winner of the Jim Thorpe (Best Defensive Back) as a cornerback. He had the size, length and coverage skills teams covet in a number 1 corner. His stature, relative lack of elite speed and impressive understanding of NFL offenses all led him to become a pro-bowl safety, finally flourishing with the Philadelphia Eagles. Wilson shares so much of this makeup, that it’d be almost redundant to describe it. Simply put, Wilson will find success in the NFL, it just remains to be seen at which position.

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Scouting Report: Jalen “Teez” Tabor

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By: Shae Dougall

Jalen Tabor, CB, Florida

6’0”, 199lbs

Tabor

Tape Viewed:

Florida vs Alabama (2016)

Florida vs LSU (2016)

Florida vs Florida State (2016)

OVERVIEW

Teez Tabor can do a little bit of everything. He’s a very experienced, successful cornerback from Florida whose claim to fame is a rock-solid, consistent, high-quality presence in a very good group of DBs. Despite having fairly slow straight-line speed, he has that undefinable “quickness” quality that scouts love to talk about. Tabor was made to play more off-coverage, as he’s more of a finesse guy who would probably get beaten consistently downfield if he was forced to press big, fast receivers all the time.

 

Tabor is going to be a bit of a risk-taker in the NFL if his college tape is any indication. This will result in some picks, but will also result in some big plays going the other way. A team with a good group of safeties that play over the top would likely be the ideal fit for Tabor, because some of the craftier QBs will be able to take advantage of his gambling. Tabor is also not the biggest guy in the world, and much like Tre’Davious White, I’m concerned that his lack of size will result in him not only getting boxed out of quick routes, but also getting beat over the top. His vertical jump from the combine was only 31 inches, and he did struggle with deep speed at times in college.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 10 out of 10

The reason Tabor was so successful in college was due in large part to his ability to read the quarterback’s eyes and adjust to the receiver quickly. Since Tabor is not a once-in-a-lifetime type of athlete (not even close, really), he has clearly honed his play recognition skills to make up for these deficiencies. His read and react capability is off the charts, making a few plays where he actually left his assignment to follow a play that he knew was developing elsewhere on the field. This can also be viewed as a negative I suppose, but he seems to be instinctive and smart enough to understand when to take risks.

 

Speed: 3 out of 5

Tabor disappointed at the combine with a slow 4.6 40 time. Per NFL.com, there are also “whispers” that Tabor “fears deep speed”, which is evidenced by the amount of off coverage he played at Florida. I’m not that plugged in, unfortunately, but I did see several situations on tape where Tabor was pressing the receiver and backed off more than 8 yards before the play started. He has quick recovery time when the ball is in the air, but his penchant for getting beat over the top is concerning.

 

Mirroring: 10 out of 10

Even when pressing, Tabor’s mirroring ability is excellent. He sticks to receivers coming out of cuts like glue, consistently providing tight man-to-man coverage.

 

Pursuit: 4 out of 5

While Tabor isn’t going to catch up to any plays that are over his head, he has a very solid ability to chase down plays that develop on the other side of the field. More than once on tape (especially against LSU), I saw opposing quarterbacks scramble out of a collapsing pocket only to be chased down by Tabor once the line of scrimmage had been crossed.

 

Man: 12 out of 15

Tabor will be a good man coverage corner, as he is consistently able to read the play and mirror his receiver on shorter and intermediate routes. His deep coverage ability is a concern, though, especially with the precision deep passing of NFL quarterbacks. I’d also like to see Tabor get more physical at the line of scrimmage, but I don’t believe that his lack of physicality is unfixable or even necessarily undesirable. His desire to be physical at the line is probably affected by his knowledge of his own limitations on deep routes.

 

Zone: 14 out of 15

Tabor may be the best zone corner in this draft with his uncanny instincts and penchant for reading the quarterback’s eyes. Would be an ideal fit for a team that runs a lot of zone coverage. I expect some infrequent gambling-related breakdowns in zone coverage on trick plays and misdirection passing plays. Luckily, Tabor mostly knows when to hold ‘em, and when to fold ‘em.

 

Press: 3 out of 5

I don’t foresee an NFL future in which Tabor is playing much bump-and-run coverage. Tabor can press effectively on occasion, but Florida didn’t ask him to do much of it because it’s clearly not a strength of his.

 

Tackle: 3.5 out of 5

He’s not the best tackling cornerback out there, but he’s not the worst. Once the receiver is well-covered, he’s certainly not getting any yards after the catch. Open field tackles are more of a weakness though; Tabor was occasionally out of position to tackle on deep routes where the receiver wasn’t his responsibility but he was in the area.

 

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Tabor has great hands and the ability to affect the ball in the air. He’s also great at punching the ball out of the receiver’s outstretched hands, which I saw on more than one occasion. He finished his Florida career with 9 interceptions, an impressive number.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 3 out of 5

This is a difficult category to speak to because I rarely saw Tabor stick his nose into a pile of guys and bring the runner down. I’m pretty sure he can do it because he can bring down receivers pretty consistently, but without seeing him take on the toughest college backs (even when Florida played LSU, I don’t recall seeing Tabor vs. Fournette on any occasion), I think it’s hard to be 100% certain.

 

Play Recognition: 4 out of 5

I caught Tabor out of position on a trick run play against LSU, but that was a special circumstance. I can assume that he usually realizes when the run is developing, similarly to how he always seems to know where the pass is going to go.

 

Willingness: 2 out of 5

He is not an eager participant in run support, but he will get involved if it looks like the play is getting serious or if he is the last line of defense. Usually he gets swallowed up by a block and lets somebody else do the dirty work.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 8 out of 10

This template is a bit flawed in the sense that I’m allowed to talk about a prospect’s injury history but not his suspension history. Tabor was suspended in college a couple of times, and it’s always difficult to say how that will translate to the NFL. It’s definitely a concern. Even though injury isn’t an issue with Tabor, I would say that it’s reasonable to see him miss some time for other, less wholesome reasons.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 81.5 out of 100

Pro Comparison: Asante Samuel

Tabor 1

Samuel

Okay, this is too easy. I don’t even have to write a lot. What other NFL player in the past 15 years gambled more and tackled less than Asante Samuel? He was also a good guesser, resulting in a lot of interceptions. I maintain that Samuel could have extended his career into his mid-40s if he had just switched to a situational free safety that had a contract requirement that he wasn’t allowed to tackle anybody.

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Eagles Seven-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo
Philadelphia_Eagles_logo_primary.svg
13: R1P13: JACK CONKLIN, OT, MICHIGAN STATE
6’6 308 lbs.
Conklin
FIT: Peters is either going to collapse all of his weight on his bad knee or fade into dust at some point within the next couple of seasons, both of which are likely to happen while he’s sitting on a bench avoiding injury. Conklin is insurance in case Lane Johnson never completes the switch to the blind side. Conklin should be able to start right away on either side.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/2001906/jack-conklin
77: R3P14: RYAN KELLY, C/G, ALABAMA
6’4 311 lbs.
Ryan Kelly
FIT: Finding Kelly here in the third is enough reason to snap him up for a team that has an o-line with more leaks than a $400 per month apartment’s piping system. Jason Kelce is the undisputed starter, but Kelly could immediately challenge for a guard spot currently occupied by borderline starters.
NOTE: Kelly’s possibility to fall this far may be due to teams valuing Nick Martin of Notre Dame more. Teams may also question his pass protection since he played in a run-heavy Alabama offense.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1893142/ryan-kelly
79: R3P16: KARL JOSEPH, S, WEST VIRGINIA
5’11 205 lbs.
Joseph
FIT: Malcolm Jenkins is one of the safeties, the other is a big question mark. Walter Thurmond might not be the answer: watching him try to help cover an over-the-hill Calvin Johnson on Thanksgiving was good for some cheap laughs. He’s a UFA anyway. Joseph is a do-everything safety with play-making ability (5 interceptions in 4 games last year).
NOTE: His potential to fall this far is due to his medical, he suffered a season-ending knee injury and was unable to participate in the combine. He may also be knocked for a lack of size.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1983624/karl-joseph
114: R4P15: CHARONE PEAKE, WR, CLEMSON
6’2 209 lbs.
Charone Peake, Justin Hughes

Clemson wide receiver Charone Peake leaps for a pass over South Carolina State’s Justin Hughes during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday Aug. 31, 2013 at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C.(AP Photo/ Richard Shiro)

FIT: Nelson Agholor and Jordan Matthews look to be the top two receivers going forward, but if the drop circus Eagles fans witnessed last year is any indication, this unit is in need of a serious influx of talent. Consider also that Riley Cooper was released and Seyi Ajirotutu is expected to make a significant contribution and this is clearly a disaster zone on the roster.
NOTE: His availability is likely due to his small hands and medical question marks.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1850735/charone-peake
153: R5P14: TAJAE SHARPE, WR, MASSACHUSETTS
6’2 194 lbs.
Sharpe
FIT: Did I mention in the last blurb that Josh Huff is supposed to compete for playing time? Yikes. He’s practice-squad fodder, if at all rosterable. Sharpe should come in immediately and compete for that fourth receiver spot, possibly even third depending on Peake’s medical situation.
164: R5P25: NILE LAWRENCE-STAMPLE, DT, FLORIDA STATE
6’1 320 lbs.
Lawrence-Stample
FIT: This pick is largely contingent on the expectation that the Eagles transition to an attacking 4-3 under new coordinator Jim Schwartz. Before Rex Ryan ruined every Bill’s fans lives by miscasting every Buffalo defensive player, Schwartz used the immense pool of talent to create one of the best pass-rushing units in the league. While he has capable potential starters in Bennie Logan and Cedric Thornton at defensive tackle, there isn’t much depth behind them. Lawrence-Stample projects as a rotational tackle with the ability to swallow double teams and free up the Eagles’ many penetrators.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1860756/nile-lawrence-stample
191: R6P13: TRAVIS FEENEY, OLB, WASHINGTON
6’4 230 lbs.
NCAA FOOTBALL, California at Washington

102613 – SEATTLE, WA – Washington’s Travis Feeney gets to Cal quarterback Jared Goff, dropping him after a 6-yard broken pass play in the first quarter. (UWFOOTBALL27)

FIT: Again assuming a Schwartz-led 4-3, the starters at linebacker are: WLB: Mychal Kendricks (solid), MLB: Kiko Alonso (fantastic), SLB: Jordan Hicks/Connor Barwin (depending on whether they use the Sam in coverage or as more of an enforcer. That considered, the cupboard is largely bare as far as backups go, Feeney has the speed and coverage skills to play Will or fill in at Mike and would be a fun chess piece for a creative coordinator like Schwartz.
NOTE: Feeney is being under-appreciated due to his unusual size, however his combine numbers could open the eyes of some teams. If he falls this far, he’d be a major steal.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1884443/travis-feeney
231: R7P12: JONATHAN WILLIAMS, RB, ARKANSAS
5’11 220 lbs.
J. Williams
FIT: At least one of the starting trio: DeMarco Murray, Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles likely won’t suit up for the Eagles this season. My money is on Murray, since he probably gets off to tape of the Cowboys o-line and is begging Jerry and company to buy him back. Can’t blame him either, as I also get off to tape of the Cowboys o-line. Just magnificent. That aside, Williams is a highly talented back out of Arkansas and the forgotten man in the Alex Collins backfield timeshare. He’s got all the traits teams desire and an injury bad enough to drop him into the seventh round, but not so bad that it could be career threatening. Perfect recipe for a team who can afford to wait for him to heal and develop.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1999948/jonathan-williams
249: R7P30: WR KEYARRIS GARRETT, WR, TULSA
6’3 220 lbs.
Garrett
FIT: And behind Ajirotutu and Huff on the depth chart? Jonathan Krause, Freddie Martino, Xavier Rush and Seantavious Jones, that sounds more like a badminton starting lineup. A triple-dip at receiver doesn’t seem so gratuitous now does it? Besides that, Garrett is a massive player with traits to develop into an impressive talent. He could be the steal of the draft, found at this late stage.
NOTE: Garrett’s only chance of falling this far is if teams are scared by his lack of polish, there are far more accomplished receivers with more refined traits to be had ahead of him, so it is possible.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1877398/keyarris-garrett

A Prospect a Day: 4-3 Defensive Ends, Shaq Lawson Scouting Report

January 15, 2016

A Prospect a Day: This series, launching today, will outline one prospect per day, every day up to the upcoming draft. However, it is entirely possible that some days may feature more than one prospect.

The series will be starting with 4-3 Defensive Ends

SHAQ LAWSON, DE, CLEMSON

6’4 260 lbs

Shaq Lawson

 

OVERVIEW:

Very nice height, weight, speed combination, but probably larger than you’d want from an edge rusher in a 3-4.

Ideal fit is as a 4-3 end, though may even be effective as a 3-4 end due to his strong pocket-pushing ability and well-rounded abilities as a pass rusher and run-stuffer.

Can get sideline-to-sideline when needed and has a relentless motor, often making plays due to sheer effort.

Lacks a versatile arsenal of pass rushing skills, will sometimes use a spin move, but mostly sticks to a swim or bull rush, which is effective due to the massive strength in his lower body.

He’s a strong tackler and usually a strong finisher at the point of attack, which makes him effective even in goal line situations.

Could be an asset on an NFL roster, if not right away then within the first two years, though he has a relatively low ceiling to other prospects available in his range.

PASS RUSHING

Technique: 3 out of 5

Lacks a versatile arsenal of pass rushing moves to go along with his bendability, functional strength, speed, and tackling technique.

Effectiveness: 4 out of 5

The sack numbers (12.5 in 15 games) are plenty impressive as a full-time starter on the edge who constantly sees chips and double teams, he’s a relentless effort guy that makes plays in the backfield more often than not.

Potential: 3 out of 5

Even if he can shore up the pass-rushing technique, he doesn’t possess the explosiveness or first-step quickness of the elite rushers in the NFL and will have a hard time competing against premiere left tackles at the pro level for sacks.

RUN STOPPING

Technique: 3 out of 5

Lawson does a great job in play recognition, but can sometimes fail to set the edge, getting caught up in the backfield and opening lanes for runners.

Effectiveness: 3 out of 5

The 24.5 tackles for loss in 2015 shows Lawson’s strength: he lives in opponents’ backfields. It is also reveals his weakness as he often runs himself right out of plays rather than relying on sound technique to set the edge and hook the runner. His 59 tackles this season were due more to effort and motor than effectiveness in stopping the run.

Potential: 4 out of 5

The good news is, Lawson has all of the functional strength to be an above-average edge setter at the pro level, he just needs to be coached up. I would hesitate to project him as a premiere run stopper unless he puts on a little more weight, since I think he may get bullied by some of the bigger road graders in the NFL like Phil Loadholt, but he should find a nice niche on an NFL roster in this regard as his career progresses.

TOTAL PROSPECT RATING: 20/30

NFL Comparison: Jeremy Mincey, DE, Dallas Cowboys

Lawson

Mincey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Mincey, Lawson thrives as a pass rusher, but possesses the dimensions and leg strength to be an effective edge-setter. They’ll never set the world on fire with their sack numbers but can be a very effective part of nearly any 4-3 defensive rotation.

Projection: Top-15 pick

Mock Drafts 1.0 (Picks 11-15)

Mock Draft 1.0 Picks 11-15

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Picks 1-15 now available in NFL Draft

11 Vikings helmet Trae Waynes, CB, Michigan State

The Vikings are another team with a litany of needs. They’ve got a good young quarterback, a solid young receiver in Charles Johnson and a promising young safety in Harrison Smith. Also, last year’s big money man Everson Griffen has panned out so far.

They can stand for upgrades pretty much everywhere else on the roster. So why a running mate for starter Xavier Rhodes? Simple, Waynes is a top-10 talent and he’s available outside the top 10. Waynes has ball-hawking abilities, excellent speed to close on deep balls, good man-coverage/press abilities and fits the scheme for the Vikings. He would immediately help solidify the secondary in much the same way that Desmond Trufant did for the Falcons a couple years ago.

waynes

Is that you, Richard Sherman?

Height: 6’0

Weight: 186 lbs.

2014 Stats: 46 tackles, 2 tackles for loss, 3 interceptions, 8 passes broken up, 1 sack

Projection: Above-average starter

Floor: Slot corner

Ceiling: Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Al Harris (CB, Green Bay Packers)- Man/press corner with fluid hips, shutdown skill traits, physical throughout the coverage and always in position to contest for the ball at the highest point.

12 browns helmet DeVante Paker, WR, Louisville

Josh Gordon is pretty much a lost cause, no matter how talented he is. Also, did you see how bad Josh McCown was last year with two quality receivers last year in Evans and Jackson? Imagine him throwing to Andrew Hawkins and Dwayne Bowe. Can you win less than 0 games?

Needless to say, the Browns have to start injecting some talent into their receiving corps. Parker fits the range here and provides an all-around receiver who is big-bodied, tall and consistent. Though it might have been nice to grab a lineman here, there’s no pure right tackle that really fits at this juncture. Plus, they have two first round picks, so there might be better options for the range at 19. Parker should step in immediately as a package player and fight for more playing time very quickly.

parker

Parker photo-shopped himself into beating FSU

Height: 6’3

Weight: 209 lbs.

2014 Stats: (6 games) 43 catches, 855 yards, 5 touchdowns

Projection: Above-Average WR2

Floor: journeyman

Ceiling: Low-end WR1

NFL Comparison: Limas Sweed (WR, Pittsburgh Steelers)- A consistent producer, can get behind defenses but does his best work in traffic, needs more polish as a route runner, uses his large frame to shield defenders and consistently come down with the contested catch.

13 saints Shane Ray, OLB, Missouri

The Saints, despite what most people are aware of, want to move on from their top sack-specialist Junior Galette. Ray is about as close as this draft has to Galette in terms of pure pass-rushing skill set. Ray is certainly more raw but he’s more pro-ready than Galette was when he came out. I look at this pick as a way to replace Galette, versus an option to pair with him. Though I could be wrong.

Waynes is no longer on the board so no defensive backs fit the range. La’el Collins could be tempting here but this is banking on Payton really wanting to move on from their top pass-rusher who has been in legal trouble recently. We’ll see how that all plays out. Not to mention, Ray is a top-10 talent in this year’s draft so he has very good value at 13.

shane ray

Blake Sims, what a flop

Height: 6’3

Weight: 245 lbs.

2014 Stats: 65 tackles, 22.5 tackles for loss, 13 sacks, 3 forced fumbles, 1 blocked kick.

Projection: Strong Starter

Floor: Journeyman

Ceiling: Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Larry English- Strong in the pass rush, with raw, unrefined technique. Adept laterally against the run but struggles when having to play downhill, often washed out of the play by more powerful lineman, also lacks ideal length as a pass-rusher.

14 miami La’el Collins, G, LSU

The Dolphins spent big in free agency on defense. A lot of their salary cap is now occupied by defensive players and what typically happens in those scenarios is the other unit suffers. The way to avoid this is to inject cheap, young labor into the other side of the ball. Good start with Kenny Stills, but the Dolphins o-line has been a problem since Jake Long flamed out.

La’el Collins instantly adds depth to the line and can likely take up a guard spot very early in his career. I hesitate to say he’s a day-1 starter just because Zack Martin worked out for the Cowboys last year. Remember, he had Frederick (an excellent young center) playing next to him the whole time. I also don’t think Collins is quite on Martin’s level in pass protection. As a road grader with bad intent though, the Dolphins couldn’t do much better.

la'el collins

Big man, can’t even play LT in NFL

Height: 6’4

Weight: 305 lbs.

Projection: Above-average starter

Floor: Versatile backup

Ceiling: Strong starter

NFL Comparison: Shelley Smith, G, St. Louis Rams- While not quite skilled enough to stand out as pass-blocker, the push in the run game is highly impressive. Prototypical frame for a flexible lineman, could stand-out as a right tackle later on.

15 49ers helmet Marcus Peters, CB, Washington

The 49ers need a new defense. They have a few holdover starters and a whole lot of question marks heading into the Tomsula year(s). The biggest problem, arguably, is cornerback where starters on both sides of the defense have left via free agency. This is especially distressing since Culliver and Cox were two of the bright spots on a 49ers defense that really kept the team afloat last year amid all the controversy.

Marcus Peters, talent-wise, fits the range as a top-15 player. He comes with serious character concerns but Perrish Cox had similar issues in his starting role. The 49ers are a team that’s been known to gamble in the draft, and they do it again here at a position of dire need. Peters has scheme versatility and polish like no other corner in this draft. Though he’s not as strong in man as Waynes.

peters

What an on-field distraction

Height: 6’0

Weight: 197 lbs.

2014 Stats: 30 tackles, 4 tackles for loss, 3 intereceptions, 7 passes broken up (8 games)

Projection: Average starter

Floor: Flame-out of the league

Ceiling: Pro Bowler

NFL Comparison: Jonathan Joseph- Not overly impressive size or frame, makes up for it as a feisty defender at the point of attack. Has a nose for the ball and the closing speed and awareness to turn deflections into interceptions.