Scouting Report: Adoree’ Jackson

Adoree’ Jackson, CB, USC

5’10 186 lbs

Jackson

Tape Viewed: 2016 vs. Cal, 2016 vs. University of Washington, 2016 vs. Notre Dame

OVERVIEW

Jackson is definitely a mixed bag in terms of his prospects as an NFL cornerback. He has the attitude, confidence, short memory and athleticism to excel as a number 1 outside corner in this league. What he lacks is consistency, versatility in his skillset, and the ability to translate that elite athleticism into his coverage.

It’s quite bizzare watching the incredible fluidity of Jackson when he returns kicks and punts, versus the stiffness that shows up from time to time on tape in man coverage. Jackson is at his most comfortable rallying to the football, reading the QB’s eyes and contesting at the catch point. He did, however, have a brilliant game against Notre Dame in which he flashed press, bump and run capabilities. Too often, though, he loses his footing to give up huge plays, as he did in man against Notre Dame’s Kevin Stepherson and UW’s John Ross.

Jackson will immediately bring an electric edge to any team’s return game. I believe he has the ability to have a Devin Hester-like impact in that area with four kick return TD’s and four punt return TD’s in college to his name. Teams will need to be patient with bringing him along as a coverage man though, he needs to be coached up on his technique, but has all the traits to thrive, especially in a zone-heavy scheme.

COVERAGE

Play Recognition: 8 out of 10

By no means a weakness in Jackson’s game, it’s clear that coaches told him to run bail technique against John Ross to avoid the big play. In the other two games I reviewed, Jackson consistently puts himself in solid position to affect the play, however he got toasted by Notre Dame’s Kevin Stepherson on a sluggo which resulted in a TD.

Speed: 5 out of 5

Just watch one play and you know you’re dealing with elite, game-changing speed. This stretches into his agility and acceleration as well. More often than not, he’s an ultra-explosive athlete.

Mirroring: 8 out of 10

An area of the game that has improved steadily over his career, it doesn’t seem that Jackson has any issues following receiver movements in terms of recognition, but his footing causes him to trip up more often than you’d like to see from an elite prospect.

Pursuit: 5 out of 5

This is the single greatest attribute Jackson possesses, and likely what makes him such a great returner, he closes so well, and he loves it. You’ll constantly see Jackson trick QB’s into thinking he’s left his man open, only to jump in front of the ball and snag a pick or PBU.

Man: 11 out of 15

This is not so much of an indictment of his abilities going forward, because he has improved greatly in this area, but nearly every bad play Jackson has on tape is in man coverage. Make no mistake, he has many good plays as well. He has the attributes you want in man, but must take coaching to learn how to use his feet better.

Zone: 15 out of 15

There isn’t a better zone corner prospect in this draft. Jackson, in a zone-heavy scheme, could be an immediate impact starter in the NFL. His natural ability and fluidity in the return game translates perfectly to his zone coverage. He’s an absolute playmaker when he’s reading the QB’s eyes.

Press: 3 out of 5

The Notre Dame tape shows a lot of reasons to expect this area to improve going forward. Jackson looked natural bumping with one hand in press and flipping his hips to perfectly mirror receivers downfield. He just doesn’t do it often enough to warrant a higher score.

Tackle: 2 out of 5

This is a concerning area. He has one outstanding form tackle on tape, that’s it. He also has one impressive open-field tackle of John Ross. Both times, he needed help to bring his man down. There are also a few bad misses on tape in which Jackson throws his body out of position, to somewhat comical results.

Ball Skills: 5 out of 5

Another area where Jackson might just be the best in the draft, his 5 interceptions in 2016 are insane when considering he’s the single most talented member of that USC secondary, and QB’s didn’t challenge him much. That’s not even to mention his 28 career PBU’s.

RUN SUPPORT

Tackle: 3 out of 5

It’s tempting to give this an incomplete, because he only has two tackle attempts on running backs on tape, which are successful. However, he consistently puts himself in position as a last line of defense and often allows tackles to happen by maintaining lane discipline.

Play Recognition: 5 out of 5

Jackson plays like the savvy three-year starter he is, and that doesn’t change against the run, in which he immediately (and often quicker than most members of the secondary) rallies to his position as a run defender.

Willingness: 2 out of 5

This is not to say he doesn’t like being a run defender, more that he doesn’t like being directly involved. Jackson prefers to become essentially a deep cover safety when a run play develops, trusting his speed and athleticism as the last line of defense. This approach has its merits and will be appreciated by some NFL scouts, though I would really like to see a nastier demeanor from Jackson.

GENERAL

Injury: 10 out of 10

This guy has started nearly every game since week 1 of his first year as a true freshman. And that’s while playing in all three phases of the game. You couldn’t find a more encouraging sign that injuries won’t be a systemic issue in his NFL career.

Total Prospect Rating: 82 out of 100

Jackson 1

Norman

Pro Comparison: Josh Norman, CB, Washington Redskins

While it is incredibly difficult to find a player with the exact (and incredibly unique) skillset of Jackson, Norman shares the same ultra-confidence, short memory and explosive pursuit which I expect will propel Jackson to quick success in the NFL as an outside corner.

Scouting Report: Sidney Jones IV

Sidney Jones, CB, Washington

6’0 181 lbs.

 

Jones IV 1

 

Tape Viewed: 2015 vs. USC, 2016 vs. USC, 2016 vs. Colorado, 2016 vs. Washington State, 2016 vs. Oregon

 

OVERVIEW

 

Jones is being hailed as a top prospect on the level of Marlon Humphrey and Marshon Lattimore, and I think people are overlooking some deficiencies.

Jones gets a lot of credit for not giving up touchdowns, and keeping plays in front of him, but struggles with closing speed on timing routes against good route runners. He is especially susceptible on tape to one of the most basic routes: the 10 yard hitch. Quarterbacks tended to shy away from testing him in college, but this aspect will be exposed in the NFL.

There are many things to appreciate about Jones game though, starting with his confidence. He plays the game with the mentality that he’s better than you, and it clearly intimidates his competition. His loose hips help with his exceptional mirroring ability in coverage, though he seems to have a lot of wasted movement that needs to be cleaned up by NFL secondary coaches.

Jones also has exceptional physicality in both the passing game and run support as a tackler. Watching the tape, the word that comes up again and again for him is feisty. While I believe Jones will struggle early in his career, he has pro bowl potential as a reliable number one corner.

 

COVERAGE

 

Play Recognition: 9 out of 10

 

Diagnosing in the pass often helps Jones to be in the right position, as evidenced by the fact that he’s thrown against so seldom despite there being NFL talent all over the Washington secondary.

 

Speed: 3 out of 5

 

I have my concerns about Jones’ burst in particular, as he is often burned by sharp cuts. He is also unable to keep up on deep crosses at times, and uses bail technique constantly to prevent big plays.

 

Mirroring: 9 out of 10

 

It’s clear that Jones is a natural in reading even the most experienced college receivers, as he reacts immediately and often anticipates route changes.

 

Pursuit: 3 out of 5

 

This is an area that concerns me with Jones, though it is not necessarily a weakness.

 

Man: 14 out of 15

 

A true lockdown corner in college, Jones consistently shutdown his man in one-on-one, evidenced by his dominant performances against future NFL receiver USC’s Juju Smith-Schuster.

 

Zone: 11 out of 15

 

There isn’t much zone to review on tape for Jones, but some of his skillset would seem to translate well to zone coverage. Some of his less impressive plays were in zone though, and his pursuit is concerning.

 

Press: 5 out of 5

 

Jones loves to mix it up and hang in the receiver’s hip pocket off the bump, it’s where he’s at his best.

 

Tackle: 4 out of 5

 

He can get moved off his spot, but once he engages, he consistently brings the ball carrier down or out of bounds.

 

Ball Skills: 4 out of 5

 

This is an area where I’d like to see a top prospect earn top marks, but it’s by no means a weakness, Jones has some exceptional plays on the ball on tape, but several missed opportunities as well.

 

RUN SUPPORT

 

Tackle: 5 out of 5

 

Can get moved off his spot, but is exceptional in run support at bringing an end to the play prematurely.

 

Play Recognition: 4 out of 5

 

Most of his diagnose is solid, and he has some impressive reads on tape.

 

Willingness: 5 out of 5

 

Jones is clearly eager to be active all over the field and this extends in a very noticeable way to his run support.

 

GENERAL

 

Injury: 3 out of 10

 

Jones sustained an Achilles tendon tear while running the 40 at his pro day, putting his 2016 season effectively on ice. This could be an injury that affects his career going forward as Jones relies heavily on his sudden explosiveness.

 

Total Prospect Rating: 79/100

 

Pro Comparison: Aaron Colvin, CB, Jacksonville Jaguars

D.D. Goodson, Sidney Jones

NFL: Jacksonville Jaguars at Houston Texans

Colvin was far less touted coming out of Oklahoma, but proved to be an incredibly reliable cover corner that excelled as a run supporter, peaking in 2016, his fourth year in the league. Jones possesses a similar skillset with his ability as a run defender to go along with his incredibly confident play in coverage. Like Colvin, I expect Jones to take a few years before settling in as a solid starter.

Eagles Seven-Round Mock Draft

NFL-Draft-Logo
Philadelphia_Eagles_logo_primary.svg
13: R1P13: JACK CONKLIN, OT, MICHIGAN STATE
6’6 308 lbs.
Conklin
FIT: Peters is either going to collapse all of his weight on his bad knee or fade into dust at some point within the next couple of seasons, both of which are likely to happen while he’s sitting on a bench avoiding injury. Conklin is insurance in case Lane Johnson never completes the switch to the blind side. Conklin should be able to start right away on either side.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/2001906/jack-conklin
77: R3P14: RYAN KELLY, C/G, ALABAMA
6’4 311 lbs.
Ryan Kelly
FIT: Finding Kelly here in the third is enough reason to snap him up for a team that has an o-line with more leaks than a $400 per month apartment’s piping system. Jason Kelce is the undisputed starter, but Kelly could immediately challenge for a guard spot currently occupied by borderline starters.
NOTE: Kelly’s possibility to fall this far may be due to teams valuing Nick Martin of Notre Dame more. Teams may also question his pass protection since he played in a run-heavy Alabama offense.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1893142/ryan-kelly
79: R3P16: KARL JOSEPH, S, WEST VIRGINIA
5’11 205 lbs.
Joseph
FIT: Malcolm Jenkins is one of the safeties, the other is a big question mark. Walter Thurmond might not be the answer: watching him try to help cover an over-the-hill Calvin Johnson on Thanksgiving was good for some cheap laughs. He’s a UFA anyway. Joseph is a do-everything safety with play-making ability (5 interceptions in 4 games last year).
NOTE: His potential to fall this far is due to his medical, he suffered a season-ending knee injury and was unable to participate in the combine. He may also be knocked for a lack of size.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1983624/karl-joseph
114: R4P15: CHARONE PEAKE, WR, CLEMSON
6’2 209 lbs.
Charone Peake, Justin Hughes

Clemson wide receiver Charone Peake leaps for a pass over South Carolina State’s Justin Hughes during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday Aug. 31, 2013 at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, S.C.(AP Photo/ Richard Shiro)

FIT: Nelson Agholor and Jordan Matthews look to be the top two receivers going forward, but if the drop circus Eagles fans witnessed last year is any indication, this unit is in need of a serious influx of talent. Consider also that Riley Cooper was released and Seyi Ajirotutu is expected to make a significant contribution and this is clearly a disaster zone on the roster.
NOTE: His availability is likely due to his small hands and medical question marks.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1850735/charone-peake
153: R5P14: TAJAE SHARPE, WR, MASSACHUSETTS
6’2 194 lbs.
Sharpe
FIT: Did I mention in the last blurb that Josh Huff is supposed to compete for playing time? Yikes. He’s practice-squad fodder, if at all rosterable. Sharpe should come in immediately and compete for that fourth receiver spot, possibly even third depending on Peake’s medical situation.
164: R5P25: NILE LAWRENCE-STAMPLE, DT, FLORIDA STATE
6’1 320 lbs.
Lawrence-Stample
FIT: This pick is largely contingent on the expectation that the Eagles transition to an attacking 4-3 under new coordinator Jim Schwartz. Before Rex Ryan ruined every Bill’s fans lives by miscasting every Buffalo defensive player, Schwartz used the immense pool of talent to create one of the best pass-rushing units in the league. While he has capable potential starters in Bennie Logan and Cedric Thornton at defensive tackle, there isn’t much depth behind them. Lawrence-Stample projects as a rotational tackle with the ability to swallow double teams and free up the Eagles’ many penetrators.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1860756/nile-lawrence-stample
191: R6P13: TRAVIS FEENEY, OLB, WASHINGTON
6’4 230 lbs.
NCAA FOOTBALL, California at Washington

102613 – SEATTLE, WA – Washington’s Travis Feeney gets to Cal quarterback Jared Goff, dropping him after a 6-yard broken pass play in the first quarter. (UWFOOTBALL27)

FIT: Again assuming a Schwartz-led 4-3, the starters at linebacker are: WLB: Mychal Kendricks (solid), MLB: Kiko Alonso (fantastic), SLB: Jordan Hicks/Connor Barwin (depending on whether they use the Sam in coverage or as more of an enforcer. That considered, the cupboard is largely bare as far as backups go, Feeney has the speed and coverage skills to play Will or fill in at Mike and would be a fun chess piece for a creative coordinator like Schwartz.
NOTE: Feeney is being under-appreciated due to his unusual size, however his combine numbers could open the eyes of some teams. If he falls this far, he’d be a major steal.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1884443/travis-feeney
231: R7P12: JONATHAN WILLIAMS, RB, ARKANSAS
5’11 220 lbs.
J. Williams
FIT: At least one of the starting trio: DeMarco Murray, Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles likely won’t suit up for the Eagles this season. My money is on Murray, since he probably gets off to tape of the Cowboys o-line and is begging Jerry and company to buy him back. Can’t blame him either, as I also get off to tape of the Cowboys o-line. Just magnificent. That aside, Williams is a highly talented back out of Arkansas and the forgotten man in the Alex Collins backfield timeshare. He’s got all the traits teams desire and an injury bad enough to drop him into the seventh round, but not so bad that it could be career threatening. Perfect recipe for a team who can afford to wait for him to heal and develop.
                                   http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1999948/jonathan-williams
249: R7P30: WR KEYARRIS GARRETT, WR, TULSA
6’3 220 lbs.
Garrett
FIT: And behind Ajirotutu and Huff on the depth chart? Jonathan Krause, Freddie Martino, Xavier Rush and Seantavious Jones, that sounds more like a badminton starting lineup. A triple-dip at receiver doesn’t seem so gratuitous now does it? Besides that, Garrett is a massive player with traits to develop into an impressive talent. He could be the steal of the draft, found at this late stage.
NOTE: Garrett’s only chance of falling this far is if teams are scared by his lack of polish, there are far more accomplished receivers with more refined traits to be had ahead of him, so it is possible.
                                     http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1877398/keyarris-garrett